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Esther Schiller

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
I am delighted that the Thousand Oaks City Council is considering the problem of secondhand smoke. I have asthma and severe obstructive lung disease, the latter perhaps because my parents smoked when I was a child. When William Reilly, then head of the EPA, released the report on secondhand smoke in January, he stressed that it is 10 times more dangerous than any other pollutant regulated by the EPA, including smog. Throughout my life, it has been very difficult to find work in a smoke-free environment.
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REAL ESTATE
July 10, 2005
The nonsmoking condo owner who breathed neighbors' tobacco smoke for 21 years and then developed lung cancer ("Decades of Living Next Door to Smokers Have Taken Their Toll," July 3) is an important message for every person who lives in multiunit housing. Apartments and condominiums are the only California locations where people have no protection from secondhand smoke, and it's time to consider some regulations. The website davis-stirling.com offers information about this issue. At the very least, there should be smoking and nonsmoking sections in apartments and condominiums and smoking in outdoor designated areas so that others are not harmed.
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REAL ESTATE
July 10, 2005
The nonsmoking condo owner who breathed neighbors' tobacco smoke for 21 years and then developed lung cancer ("Decades of Living Next Door to Smokers Have Taken Their Toll," July 3) is an important message for every person who lives in multiunit housing. Apartments and condominiums are the only California locations where people have no protection from secondhand smoke, and it's time to consider some regulations. The website davis-stirling.com offers information about this issue. At the very least, there should be smoking and nonsmoking sections in apartments and condominiums and smoking in outdoor designated areas so that others are not harmed.
MAGAZINE
November 5, 1995
Regarding "Uncivil Liberties" (On the Town, by Patt Morrison, Sept. 17): I was outdoors waiting for ground transportation at LAX when a man nearby started to light a cigarette. "Please sir," I begged, "I have asthma. Please don't light that cigarette." He looked at me and put the cigarette away. His bus pulled up before I could say thank you. Again, while leaving the post office, I noticed a woman puffing a cigarette coming through the doors. "Stop," I shouted. "Smoking is not permitted in here."
MAGAZINE
November 5, 1995
Regarding "Uncivil Liberties" (On the Town, by Patt Morrison, Sept. 17): I was outdoors waiting for ground transportation at LAX when a man nearby started to light a cigarette. "Please sir," I begged, "I have asthma. Please don't light that cigarette." He looked at me and put the cigarette away. His bus pulled up before I could say thank you. Again, while leaving the post office, I noticed a woman puffing a cigarette coming through the doors. "Stop," I shouted. "Smoking is not permitted in here."
OPINION
November 28, 1993
How would restaurant owners react if a patron suddenly began to cut up the employees with a steak knife? They wouldn't smile benignly and pass out more knives. Why do these particular restaurant owners who are complaining about the new L.A. city smoke-free restaurant ordinance insist that their employees must risk cancer, heart disease and lung damage in order to keep their jobs? (Nov. 17) As a society we no longer condone drinking and driving. Smoking in public places is equivalent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991
Someone tampers with Sudafed and three people are poisoned and die. The manufacturer and the retailers remove the product from stores. The public is frightened but comforted by the response. No one tampers with tobacco products but they kill approximately 400,000 smokers a year, along with approximately 53,000 involuntary smokers. The manufacturers do not remove the product from the stores and deny the results of scientific studies. In addition, they provide sizable contributions to the reelection campaigns of some well-placed politicians so that effective laws and educational campaigns to protect the public are circumvented or prevented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1993
The smoke-filled air of the recent Southern California firestorms made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Eyes burned and breathing was impaired while those of us with asthma and other respiratory disabilities were advised to remain indoors and turn on our air conditioners. That was good advice for those of us who had air conditioners. Now that winter is upon us with temperatures outside dropping, the air is once again filled with the smoke of fires, this time from the fireplaces of my neighbors.
BOOKS
November 17, 1991
Those of us with allergies and respiratory disabilities appreciated Harry Shearer's cranky complaints on the overuse of perfumes and scents ("Making a Stink," Oct. 13). Here's a request to those who wear scents: Think about where you will be during the course of your day. Will a stranger be forced to be close to you in an airplane, theater, meeting? Then please don't use the scent even though you may feel undressed without it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
In response to Betty Raskoff Kazmin's admirable analysis of the dilemma faced by Los Angeles schoolteachers (Commentary, Oct. 22): If there is a pay cut, it should be treated as a contribution to the school district, because that is what it truly is. Teachers paychecks should reflect no cut, but rather a specific contribution that is tax deductible. Salary schedules should remain unchanged so that retirement, which is based on an averaging of the last three years of a teacher's salary, is unaffected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1993
The smoke-filled air of the recent Southern California firestorms made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Eyes burned and breathing was impaired while those of us with asthma and other respiratory disabilities were advised to remain indoors and turn on our air conditioners. That was good advice for those of us who had air conditioners. Now that winter is upon us with temperatures outside dropping, the air is once again filled with the smoke of fires, this time from the fireplaces of my neighbors.
OPINION
November 28, 1993
How would restaurant owners react if a patron suddenly began to cut up the employees with a steak knife? They wouldn't smile benignly and pass out more knives. Why do these particular restaurant owners who are complaining about the new L.A. city smoke-free restaurant ordinance insist that their employees must risk cancer, heart disease and lung damage in order to keep their jobs? (Nov. 17) As a society we no longer condone drinking and driving. Smoking in public places is equivalent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
I am delighted that the Thousand Oaks City Council is considering the problem of secondhand smoke. I have asthma and severe obstructive lung disease, the latter perhaps because my parents smoked when I was a child. When William Reilly, then head of the EPA, released the report on secondhand smoke in January, he stressed that it is 10 times more dangerous than any other pollutant regulated by the EPA, including smog. Throughout my life, it has been very difficult to find work in a smoke-free environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991
Someone tampers with Sudafed and three people are poisoned and die. The manufacturer and the retailers remove the product from stores. The public is frightened but comforted by the response. No one tampers with tobacco products but they kill approximately 400,000 smokers a year, along with approximately 53,000 involuntary smokers. The manufacturers do not remove the product from the stores and deny the results of scientific studies. In addition, they provide sizable contributions to the reelection campaigns of some well-placed politicians so that effective laws and educational campaigns to protect the public are circumvented or prevented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988
Question: What government is it that kills its own people to protect them? The United States government with its uranium production plant in Ohio has been killing American citizens by poisoning their air and water with dangerous levels of radiation for 37 years. Why didn't anyone "blow the whistle?" Was it because there was no adequate protection for whistle-blowers? How dare President Ronald Reagan put us all in continued danger by vetoing the bill to protect whistle-blowers (Part I, Oct. 27)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1995
This is an urgent request to film- and theater-goers: Please don't wear perfume. Those of us with asthma plead for your cooperation. Perfume, like tobacco smoke, can be a severe irritant for those of us with reactive airway disease or asthma. Lungs constrict, air passages narrow and it can become increasingly difficult to breathe. One in 20 people in the United State has asthma, and nearly 5,000 die of it each year. There are many other Americans who may experience uncomfortable symptoms in the presence of perfume: 33 million with sinus problems, at least 50 million with allergies, 12 million with chronic bronchitis and 2 million with emphysema.
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