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Esther Snyder

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BUSINESS
September 14, 1997
It was refreshing to read about a company that after 50 years was still family-owned, valued and rewarded employee effort and held to long-cherished virtues and Godliness ("More Than Fare," Aug. 15). It is gratifying to know of a business executive who has for a pastor a man who never compromises on God's word and the principles and precepts that are found there. Pause and consider what life would be like were people like Esther Snyder the rule rather than the exception. STEVEN DAVIS Claremont
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2011 | By Bob Pool and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Cathy Martinez and Alejandra Ruiz were served up a double-double dose of frustration Friday when they visited an old In-N-Out Burger stand in Baldwin Park. First they discovered that the historic outlet just a stone's throw from the chain's first drive-thru was being demolished. Then an employee told them they couldn't take a souvenir brick from the pile of rubble. "My husband cried when he heard this was being torn down," said Martinez, of Pomona. " I cried when I found out," said Ruiz, of Baldwin Park.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Special to The Times
Esther Snyder, who with her late husband Harry co-founded In-N-Out Burger in Baldwin Park in 1948 and popularized the drive-through window for the fast-food industry, has died. She was 86. Snyder, who had succeeded her husband and two sons as head of the family business, died Friday, according to an announcement from the company. Neither the cause nor the place of death was announced.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2010 | By Kevin Pang, Tribune Newspapers
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. -- College freshman year was when the collective words "In-N-Out Burger" first formed in my ears, in that order, in a sentence. The words "let's go" and "right now" also were involved, I believe. Being an underfed and overly persuadable student, I took up any food offer that wasn't served on a university-issued plastic tray. My roommates packed into a car one night, drove seven miles west of campus to find out why everyone at our dorm was clamoring for In-N-Out.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In-N-Out Burger Co. co-founder Esther Snyder has taken over as president of the family-owned fast-food company following the death of her son, Richard A. Snyder, in a Dec. 15 plane crash. Guy Snyder, a company vice president and Esther Snyder's older son, has been chosen for the new position of chairman, and Christina Snyder, Richard's widow, has joined the privately held company's board of directors. Richard Snyder, 41, president of the burger chain since 1976, died along with Executive Vice President Philip R. West, 37, and Jack Sims, a Placentia public relations executive, when their chartered corporate jet crashed near Santa Ana Auto Mall.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In-N-Out Burger Names New President: Co-founder Esther Snyder has taken over as president of the family-owned fast-food company following the death of her son Richard A. Snyder in a Dec. 15 plane crash. Guy Snyder, a company vice president and Esther Snyder's elder son, has been chosen for the new position of chairman, and Christina Snyder, Richard's widow, has joined the privately held, Baldwin Park-based company's board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2011 | By Bob Pool and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Cathy Martinez and Alejandra Ruiz were served up a double-double dose of frustration Friday when they visited an old In-N-Out Burger stand in Baldwin Park. First they discovered that the historic outlet just a stone's throw from the chain's first drive-thru was being demolished. Then an employee told them they couldn't take a souvenir brick from the pile of rubble. "My husband cried when he heard this was being torn down," said Martinez, of Pomona. " I cried when I found out," said Ruiz, of Baldwin Park.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2000
How ironic that you have articles on the front page of the July 2 business section on companies that are the epitome of the "old" (In-N-Out Burger) and the "new" (IncredibleArt.com) economies ["Family-Owned In-N-Out Burger at a Crossroads" and "Banging on a Closing Door for 'Dot-Com' Funds"]. What the one demonstrates, the other should learn in order to survive: Economics is about people working together to produce a good product or service that many people are willing to part with their hard-earned money to buy. Period.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chuck Papez sought work at In-N-Out Burger in 1954, owner Harry Snyder offered the teenager a dollar an hour and the opportunity to build a career. He wasn't kidding. Like Snyder and his wife, Esther, and every other employee, Papez started in the kitchen, peeling potatoes at In-N-Out's first drive-thru restaurant in Baldwin Park. Within five years, Papez had moved up to management, earning enough to get married, buy a house and start a family.
NEWS
March 22, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Esther Snyder was certified by the Civil Service Commission to be one of 100 police cadets that Cleveland plans to hire. Snyder, 64, a retired teacher and a grandmother of four, says she wants to become a police officer even if forced to retire again when she reaches 65 because she'd rather be a "productive worker" than stay home collecting a pension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Special to The Times
Esther Snyder, who with her late husband Harry co-founded In-N-Out Burger in Baldwin Park in 1948 and popularized the drive-through window for the fast-food industry, has died. She was 86. Snyder, who had succeeded her husband and two sons as head of the family business, died Friday, according to an announcement from the company. Neither the cause nor the place of death was announced.
OPINION
January 18, 2006
THE DOUBLE-DOUBLE: Mere mention of it, for a devotee of In-N-Out Burger, can water the mouth and spur the feet toward the nearest available restaurant with that trademark yellow arrow. In-N-Out devotees are many, and if they seem fanatical at times, well, they have their reasons. It's not just the menu -- reliably simple in an age of multiple choice. It's not the insistence on fresh ingredients, or the ban on freezers and microwaves.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2000
How ironic that you have articles on the front page of the July 2 business section on companies that are the epitome of the "old" (In-N-Out Burger) and the "new" (IncredibleArt.com) economies ["Family-Owned In-N-Out Burger at a Crossroads" and "Banging on a Closing Door for 'Dot-Com' Funds"]. What the one demonstrates, the other should learn in order to survive: Economics is about people working together to produce a good product or service that many people are willing to part with their hard-earned money to buy. Period.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chuck Papez sought work at In-N-Out Burger in 1954, owner Harry Snyder offered the teenager a dollar an hour and the opportunity to build a career. He wasn't kidding. Like Snyder and his wife, Esther, and every other employee, Papez started in the kitchen, peeling potatoes at In-N-Out's first drive-thru restaurant in Baldwin Park. Within five years, Papez had moved up to management, earning enough to get married, buy a house and start a family.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chuck Papez sought work at In-N-Out Burger in 1954, owner Harry Snyder offered the teenager a dollar an hour and the opportunity to build a career. He wasn't kidding. Like Snyder and his wife, Esther, and every other employee, Papez started in the kitchen, peeling potatoes at In-N-Out's first drive-thru restaurant in Baldwin Park. Within five years, Papez had moved up to management, earning enough to get married, buy a house and start a family.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second brother to run In-N-Out Burger has died unexpectedly, leaving the company once again in the hands of its founding matriarch and raising questions about how heirs plan to keep the popular fast-food chain a family business. H. Guy Snyder, 48, chairman and chief executive of the Irvine-based chain, died in his sleep last Friday evening in his Lancaster home, apparently of natural causes.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, Esther Snyder cruises through the drive-through lane of an In-N-Out restaurant to monitor service levels at the burger chain she founded with her husband in 1948. Most cashiers and counter workers at the company's Baldwin Park operations center quickly learn that the 77-year-old woman isn't just another customer. But occasionally the restaurant company president catches someone napping.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chuck Papez sought work at In-N-Out Burger in 1954, owner Harry Snyder offered the teenager a dollar an hour and the opportunity to build a career. He wasn't kidding. Like Snyder and his wife, Esther, and every other employee, Papez started in the kitchen, peeling potatoes at In-N-Out's first drive-thru restaurant in Baldwin Park. Within five years, Papez had moved up to management, earning enough to get married, buy a house and start a family.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1997
It was refreshing to read about a company that after 50 years was still family-owned, valued and rewarded employee effort and held to long-cherished virtues and Godliness ("More Than Fare," Aug. 15). It is gratifying to know of a business executive who has for a pastor a man who never compromises on God's word and the principles and precepts that are found there. Pause and consider what life would be like were people like Esther Snyder the rule rather than the exception. STEVEN DAVIS Claremont
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, Esther Snyder cruises through the drive-through lane of an In-N-Out restaurant to monitor service levels at the burger chain she founded with her husband in 1948. Most cashiers and counter workers at the company's Baldwin Park operations center quickly learn that the 77-year-old woman isn't just another customer. But occasionally the restaurant company president catches someone napping.
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