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Estonia Borders Russia

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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after the tiny Baltic nations bade good riddance to the Red Army, Russian surveyors were hacking through a forest Thursday in what is viewed here as a menacing new incursion. Escorted by lumberjacks and gun-toting soldiers, the surveyors are marking a 56-mile stretch of the Russian-Estonian border, planting concrete poles every 50 yards to tighten Moscow's hold on 1,430 square miles. A two-headed eagle, the Russian symbol, glares from a plaque on each pole.
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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after the tiny Baltic nations bade good riddance to the Red Army, Russian surveyors were hacking through a forest Thursday in what is viewed here as a menacing new incursion. Escorted by lumberjacks and gun-toting soldiers, the surveyors are marking a 56-mile stretch of the Russian-Estonian border, planting concrete poles every 50 yards to tighten Moscow's hold on 1,430 square miles. A two-headed eagle, the Russian symbol, glares from a plaque on each pole.
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NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Estonian bank of the River Narva, a tall white castle built by Danes in the 13th Century still guards this ancient city. Glowering straight back at it from the river's eastern bank is the imposing gray Fortress of Ivangorod, which was built by Czar Ivan III three centuries later and still marks the beginning of Russian territory.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Estonian bank of the River Narva, a tall white castle built by Danes in the 13th Century still guards this ancient city. Glowering straight back at it from the river's eastern bank is the imposing gray Fortress of Ivangorod, which was built by Czar Ivan III three centuries later and still marks the beginning of Russian territory.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that makes the separation of the former Soviet republics more concrete, President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Thursday that Russia will have guards to patrol its borders with Ukraine, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Azerbaijan and Georgia, according to the Russian Itar-Tass news service. Yeltsin also announced that customs checkpoints will be established at border crossings with those six newly independent countries.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that makes the separation of the former Soviet republics more concrete, President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Thursday that Russia will have guards to patrol its borders with Ukraine, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Azerbaijan and Georgia, according to the Russian Itar-Tass news service. Yeltsin also announced that customs checkpoints will be established at border crossings with those six newly independent countries.
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