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September 4, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE and AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they did when they were free nations in the 1920s and 1930s, the once-again independent Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are reaching out to the West in a bid for foreign investment and trade.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE and AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they did when they were free nations in the 1920s and 1930s, the once-again independent Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are reaching out to the West in a bid for foreign investment and trade.
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NEWS
June 24, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia said it will take economic and political reprisals against Estonia for adopting a law that Moscow says discriminates against ethnic Russians living there. "Estonia has stepped out . . . on the road of apartheid since a third of its population have been declared aliens," Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev declared, referring to about 600,000 Russians living in the Baltic state. Deputy Foreign Minister Vitaly I.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Soviet Parliament today adopted two resolutions paving the way for the Baltic republics to have greater control of their economies. The action by the Supreme Soviet was a major victory for Baltic activists, who have accused Moscow of sapping the republics' natural resources and failing to help preserve their native cultures. One resolution would allow Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia to trade independently with other Soviet republics, Tass said.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday accused Estonia of adopting a new law so discriminatory against its ethnic Russian minority that it constitutes "ethnic cleansing and the introduction of an Estonian version of apartheid." Yeltsin's blast was the fiercest rhetorical attack by Moscow since the Baltic states became independent from the Soviet Union in 1991. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after the tiny Baltic nations bade good riddance to the Red Army, Russian surveyors were hacking through a forest Thursday in what is viewed here as a menacing new incursion. Escorted by lumberjacks and gun-toting soldiers, the surveyors are marking a 56-mile stretch of the Russian-Estonian border, planting concrete poles every 50 yards to tighten Moscow's hold on 1,430 square miles. A two-headed eagle, the Russian symbol, glares from a plaque on each pole.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary dialogue, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev expounded to congressional leaders Friday for more than an hour on his nation's crippled economy and chided the United States for withholding from Moscow the trade benefits already enjoyed by China. "What should we do for you to give us MFN?" he asked, referring to the most-favored-nation trading status sought by the Soviet Union.
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