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Estonian Popular Front

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October 3, 1988 | MICHAEL DOBBS, The Washington Post
A burgeoning political movement in Soviet Estonia on Sunday adopted a radical program demanding constitutional guarantees for private property, an end to compulsory military service and the punishment of those responsible for Stalinist crimes. The two-day congress of the Estonian Popular Front was the first such gathering in recent Soviet history to be officially sanctioned by the Communist authorities.
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NEWS
August 13, 1989
Striking ethnic Russian workers in the Soviet Baltic republic of Estonia pledged to continue their protest action against a new local voting law that disenfranchises recent immigrants, many of whom are Russians. Izvestia, the Soviet government newspaper, said that 40,000 workers are on strike.
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NEWS
October 4, 1988
Representatives of grass-roots political groups from the Ukraine to the Soviet Far East met in Tallinn, capital of the Estonian republic, and denounced what they described as attempts by Communist authorities to prevent them from organizing freely, gaining access to the mass media and participating in elections. Complaints of official harassment and even of persecution were aired at the meeting, which was attended by members of about 50 informal political organizations.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | MICHAEL DOBBS, The Washington Post
A burgeoning political movement in Soviet Estonia on Sunday adopted a radical program demanding constitutional guarantees for private property, an end to compulsory military service and the punishment of those responsible for Stalinist crimes. The two-day congress of the Estonian Popular Front was the first such gathering in recent Soviet history to be officially sanctioned by the Communist authorities.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | DAVID REMNICK, The Washington Post
Thousands of Soviet Latvians, angered that they have become a minority in their own republic, launched a mass movement here Sunday to press Moscow for a degree of independence unheard of in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Galina Rybanskaya, an ethnic Russian, has lived comfortably for 28 years in the Baltic republic of Estonia, but now she is troubled as never before by what she delicately calls "elements of discrimination." Sasha Kopytina, also Russian, married an Estonian and moved to the republic just a year ago. "I had planned to stay here all my life, but now I don't know. My rights are being restricted," she said.
NEWS
January 17, 1990
1. Parliament in Baltic republic of Lithuania voted late last year to end the Communist Party's monopoly on political power. In December, the republic's Communist Party voted to break with the national party. Lithuania's Parliament also adopted a law allowing for referendum on independence. During historic visit to Lithuania last week, Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Anti-independence demonstrators in Estonia raised the Soviet hammer-and-sickle flag over Parliament today and thousands of Soviet soldiers tried to break into Latvia's legislature as tension rose sharply in the secessionist Baltic republics. Lithuanian President Vytautas Landsbergis, in a radio interview broadcast as U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III flew to Moscow, appealed to the Americans to raise the issue of Baltic independence with Soviet leaders.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Chanting "For shame, for shame," thousands of Lithuanians on Monday jammed the center of Vilnius, the capital of the Soviet Baltic republic of Lithuania, to protest the refusal of their Parliament to proclaim Lithuanian "sovereignty" last week.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Three members of the Soviet Communist Party's ruling Politburo flew to the country's restive Baltic republics on Friday in an effort to stem the growing opposition there to proposed changes in the nation's political system. Their mission reflected the threat posed by the resurgent nationalism of the once-independent Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, particularly the threat to the reforms of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
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