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Estrellita De Rejil

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
Like so many Hollywood stories, this one started with a lie. An enterprising publicist in the 1930s wanted to promote a movie, so he hired a $5-a-day extra, dressed her in black and sent her to a statue of Rudolph Valentino in Hollywood. He pawned her off to the press and public as a woman who mourned Valentino every year on the anniversary of his death, according to "Valentino," a biography of the star by Irving Shulman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
Like so many Hollywood stories, this one started with a lie. An enterprising publicist in the 1930s wanted to promote a movie, so he hired a $5-a-day extra, dressed her in black and sent her to a statue of Rudolph Valentino in Hollywood. He pawned her off to the press and public as a woman who mourned Valentino every year on the anniversary of his death, according to "Valentino," a biography of the star by Irving Shulman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Clutching a white handkerchief to her veiled face, a sobbing woman in black took her regular front-row seat Wednesday at a Hollywood memorial service marking the death 63 years ago of movie idol Rudolph Valentino. On this occasion, however, Estrellita de Rejil wasn't grieving over the silent film actor known to millions of adoring female fans as The Sheik.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2008 | Larry Harnisch, Times Staff Writer
In the decades since Rudolph Valentino's death in 1926, one of Hollywood's odder, more macabre rituals has unfolded every Aug. 23 at his crypt -- the mysterious appearance of a Lady in Black. Her face obscured by a black veil, her identity more or less unknown, a Lady in Black (or sometimes several of them) would silently place roses at the tomb of the silver screen's "Great Lover" on the anniversary of his death from natural causes at age 31. "So many mysterious women in black moved in and out of the mausoleum in Hollywood Cemetery yesterday that it took on the appearance of the salesgirls' entrance to a large department store," The Times reported in 1938.
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