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Eta Systems Inc

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BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In a move viewed as an embarrassing blow to U.S. technological strength, financially ailing Control Data Corp. on Monday announced that it is closing its supercomputer business and cutting 3,100 jobs overall from its work force. Analysts said the loss of ETA Systems, the Control Data subsidiary that is the nation's No. 2 supercomputer maker, would, over time, hurt U.S. efforts to stay ahead of Japanese competitors and remain the world's dominant supplier of supercomputers. With the departure of ETA from the business, only one U.S. company, Cray Research, is producing supercomputers.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In a move viewed as an embarrassing blow to U.S. technological strength, financially ailing Control Data Corp. on Monday announced that it is closing its supercomputer business and cutting 3,100 jobs overall from its work force. Analysts said the loss of ETA Systems, the Control Data subsidiary that is the nation's No. 2 supercomputer maker, would, over time, hurt U.S. efforts to stay ahead of Japanese competitors and remain the world's dominant supplier of supercomputers. With the departure of ETA from the business, only one U.S. company, Cray Research, is producing supercomputers.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
The U.S. government is gearing up to prevent Japan from dominating yet another segment of the high-technology industry, the small but strategic field of supercomputers. Supercomputers are used for the most complex computing jobs such as determining air flow over an airplane wing, designing new weapons systems, cracking military codes or mapping the human body's genes. Priced at $20 million apiece, the machines' processing speed is so great it is measured in billions of computing operations per second.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | From Reuters
American makers of supercomputers, sophisticated number crunchers capable of lightning-fast calculations, are again gearing for a crack at the Japanese market. But while U.S. machines may have an edge in terms of software availability, competing with cutthroat Japanese price policies is likely to be tough, industry analysts said. Five makers of supercomputers and mini-supercomputers, with support from the U.S.
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