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Ethan Bronner

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NEWS
September 15, 1989
An angry Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said a new book on Robert H. Bork's ill-fated Supreme Court nomination incorrectly states Rehnquist broke a promise to keep Justice Lewis F. Powell's impending retirement a secret. In the book, "Battle for Justice," author Ethan Bronner says Powell told Rehnquist on June 25, 1987, that he would announce his retirement the following day and asked for "a solemn promise" to keep it a secret overnight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2010 | James Rainey
Imagine the ruckus that would erupt if editors told a journalist covering the U.S. military he had to be reassigned to another beat because his son had enlisted in the Army. The reporter's bosses might defend the change, saying they were avoiding the appearance of a conflict of interest. But wouldn't that expose another bias, against anyone with a link to the military? Something like that dilemma has editors at the New York Times waging a public debate over whether the paper's Jerusalem bureau chief, Ethan Bronner, should keep his assignment now that his son has become a member of the Israeli Defense Forces.
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BOOKS
September 17, 1989
In the April 9 Travel Section I read an article by Norman Dash about a covered wagon trip in Wyoming. I decided to take that journey back in time and I'd like you to know that it was an authentic time for me and the others, as we spent four days on the Oregon Trail by wagon, horse and walking. Trails West is a first-class outfit and should be given credit for recreating a wagon trip that gives one a great admiration for the pioneers who toughed it out four to six months traveling this terrain.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989
In the April 9 Travel Section I read an article by Norman Dash about a covered wagon trip in Wyoming. I decided to take that journey back in time and I'd like you to know that it was an authentic time for me and the others, as we spent four days on the Oregon Trail by wagon, horse and walking. Trails West is a first-class outfit and should be given credit for recreating a wagon trip that gives one a great admiration for the pioneers who toughed it out four to six months traveling this terrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2010 | James Rainey
Imagine the ruckus that would erupt if editors told a journalist covering the U.S. military he had to be reassigned to another beat because his son had enlisted in the Army. The reporter's bosses might defend the change, saying they were avoiding the appearance of a conflict of interest. But wouldn't that expose another bias, against anyone with a link to the military? Something like that dilemma has editors at the New York Times waging a public debate over whether the paper's Jerusalem bureau chief, Ethan Bronner, should keep his assignment now that his son has become a member of the Israeli Defense Forces.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
An angry Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said today that a new book on Robert H. Bork's ill-fated Supreme Court nomination incorrectly states that Rehnquist broke a promise to keep Justice Lewis F. Powell's impending retirement a secret. In the book, "Battle for Justice," author Ethan Bronner says Powell told Rehnquist on June 25, 1987, that he would announce his retirement the following day and asked for "a solemn promise" to keep it a secret overnight.
NEWS
July 18, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When he picked federal appeals Judge Stephen G. Breyer for the Supreme Court, President Clinton was counting on avoiding controversy in the Senate. Yet when Breyer's confirmation hearings got under way last week, the widely respected jurist found himself fending off conflict-of-interest charges.
OPINION
February 16, 2003 | Jonah Goldberg, Jonah Goldberg is editor at large of National Review Online and a commentator for CNN.
For nearly five years I've been bandying about a funny ethnic slur -- borrowed from "The Simpsons" -- and just when I was about to abandon it, the rest of the world discovered it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2012 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Arlen Specter, who in 30 years representing Pennsylvania in the Senate offended Republicans and Democrats in almost equal measure with maverick votes and a frank cockiness that finally ended his career in politics, died Sunday at his home in Philadelphia. He was 82. The cause was complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, his family said. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said that Arlen Specter's change of party gave President Obama a veto-proof majority in the Senate.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When reporter Susan Okie wrote on Page 1 of the Washington Post last year that advances in the treatment of premature babies could undermine support for the abortion-rights movement, she quickly heard from someone in the movement. "Her message was clear," Okie recalled recently. "I felt that they were . . . (saying) 'You're hurting the cause' . . . that I was . . . being herded back into line."
NEWS
September 15, 1989
An angry Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said a new book on Robert H. Bork's ill-fated Supreme Court nomination incorrectly states Rehnquist broke a promise to keep Justice Lewis F. Powell's impending retirement a secret. In the book, "Battle for Justice," author Ethan Bronner says Powell told Rehnquist on June 25, 1987, that he would announce his retirement the following day and asked for "a solemn promise" to keep it a secret overnight.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When abortion opponents picketed Turner Broadcasting System last summer to protest the showing of a film promoting abortion rights, TBS Chairman Ted Turner called the demonstrators "bozos" and "idiots." Many in the anti-abortion movement say Turner was simply giving public voice to what many in the media privately think of their movement. Some reporters agree.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its controversial Webster abortion decision, the media responded with a barrage of apocalyptic stories predicting political and legislative revolution. Even before the court ruling--which ultimately gave states greater latitude in regulating abortion--the Boston Globe said in a Page 1 story that "a majority of states" would be expected to "ban abortion in all but extreme circumstances" if the court made such a ruling.
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