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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges calls the Coen brothers "cool," as in "no big deal. They don't get excited too much. " Josh Brolin, who, like Bridges, has worked with the Coens on two movies now, takes Bridges' description and runs with it. "They're extremely low-key ? sometimes too low-key," Brolin says, laughing. "Ethan and I had dinner once. And I see him, he's got something under the table. And I go, 'Dude, what are you doing?' And I reached over and saw that he'd brought a book. He was reading a book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Crime does pay, apparently, as the first episode of FX's new series "Fargo" premiered Tuesday to strong ratings. The first installment of a 10-episode limited series inspired by Joel and Ethan Coen's Oscar-winning 1996 film of the same name drew 4.15 million viewers over three telecasts on Tuesday night. It delivered 1.79 million viewers in the key demographic of adults 18-49. John Landgraf, chief executive of FX Networks and FX Productions, said in a statement that he was "incredibly proud" of the show's reception.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Fargo" is coming back as a TV series. But viewers shouldn't confuse the FX series with the Oscar-winning 1996 film from Ethan and Joel Coen. The new series will be a limited drama series inspired by the film that will feature an all-new true crime story with new characters established in the trademark humor, dialect, murder and "Minnesota nice" of the original film. The 10-part series will premiere April 15. The character of Marge Gunderson, the pregnant law enforcement officer played by Frances McDormand in an Oscar-winning performance, will not be a part of the new series.  TRAILERS: Winter TV 2014 Key to the new "Fargo" will be the feel of the Minnesota region, where people "have an inability to communicate," said Noah Hawley, executive producer and writer of all the episodes.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | Michael Ordona
PERHAPS the most indelible character in Cormac McCarthy's novel "No Country for Old Men" is the unstoppable killer, Anton Chigurh. In the hands of Joel and Ethan Coen, he also becomes one of the screen's great monsters -- not only through Javier Bardem's chilling performance, but also through canny cinematic decisions. "In the novel, he's ultimately a mysterious character," says Ethan Coen, who teamed with his brother to write, direct and edit the film.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Screenwriter and producer Ethan Coen has tried his hand at prose, and one can only wonder why. "Gates of Eden" is his first book, a volume of 14 short stories by half of the Coen Brothers team that has spawned the award-winning films "Barton Fink" and "Fargo" and the wonderfully idiosyncratic "Blood Simple" and "Raising Arizona." Some of the stories are built on compelling premises.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | PETER RAINER, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer
A friend of mine once described the films of Joel and Ethan Coen as the movie equivalent of eye-catching curios you stare at in an antique shop without ever wanting them in your home, and I know what he means. Their latest film, "The Hudsucker Proxy," set in 1958 but often deliberately evoking the '30s, is a $40-million curio. As gewgaws go, it's monumental, a ship-in-a-bottle in full launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"If not now, when?" the Jewish sage Hillel famously asked, and with "A Serious Man" the Coen brothers have answered. Writer-directors Joel and Ethan have seized the opportunity afforded by the Oscar-winning success of "No Country for Old Men," to make their most personal, most intensely Jewish film, a pitch-perfect comedy of despair that, against some odds, turns out to be one of their most universal as well. Set in a very specific time and place -- the Jewish community in suburban Minneapolis circa 1967 -- that closely echoes the Coens' own background, "A Serious Man" is a memory piece re-imagined through the darkest possible lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Paul LeBlanc doesn't mind one bit that Javier Bardem calls his creation "one of the most horrible haircuts in history." LeBlanc, who has been busy with the hair salon he opened a year ago in Dieppe, New Brunswick, created the hairstyle for Bardem's character in "No Country for Old Men." On Sunday, Bardem won the supporting actor Oscar for his portrayal of Anton Chigurh in the film by Joel and Ethan Coen. "It's very good for them and for me," said LeBlanc, who has worked with Joel and Ethan Coen for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
For most filmmakers, the chillingly amusing body-count comedy that is "Fargo" would be an act of daring. For the writing-directing-producing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, however, it is a welcome piece of retrenchment. It's been almost a decade since "Raising Arizona," the last small-scale whacked-out piece of business from the Coens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Joel and Ethan Coen's new folk-music tale "Inside Llewyn Davis" has struck a chord with critics - make that a few chords, plus a couple of verses for good measure. The film, which stars Oscar Isaac as a struggling folk singer in 1960s New York, has garnered near-unanimous positive reviews. The Times' own Kenneth Turan writes , "While the bleak, funny, exquisitely made 'Inside Llewyn Davis' echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of [the Coen brothers']
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES, France - The British reporter at the press conference had a question for Oscar Isaac--the same question on a lot of reporters' minds. “Where have you come from?” It was a logical query for Isaac after seeing him in the title role in “Inside Llewyn Davis,” the sideways folk tale from Joel and Ethan Coen that's inspired - somewhat - by the life of early folk-revival musician Dave von Ronk. As the tortured, can't-catch-a-break strummer, Isaac is on screen in nearly every scene of the movie, offers plenty of subtlety and showcased some impressive singing chops to boot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | John Horn
Some spent years fighting to bring their movies to the screen. Others had the great fortune of seeing the pieces fall into place almost overnight. A few of the directors work so closely with their actors they almost become their therapists. One simply turns on the camera and lets his performers fly. The six filmmakers who recently came together at the Los Angeles Times to talk about their craft have dramatically different work and directing habits. And their films could hardly be more diverse: David Fincher's Facebook film "The Social Network," Ben Affleck's crime story "The Town," Tom Hooper's historical drama "The King's Speech," Darren Aronofsky's ballet tale "Black Swan," Lisa Cholodenko's family comedy "The Kids Are All Right" and Ethan Coen's western "True Grit" (directed with brother Joel)
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges calls the Coen brothers "cool," as in "no big deal. They don't get excited too much. " Josh Brolin, who, like Bridges, has worked with the Coens on two movies now, takes Bridges' description and runs with it. "They're extremely low-key ? sometimes too low-key," Brolin says, laughing. "Ethan and I had dinner once. And I see him, he's got something under the table. And I go, 'Dude, what are you doing?' And I reached over and saw that he'd brought a book. He was reading a book.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Don Shirley
Filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen and Charlie Kaufman are collaborating on a theatrical production, "Theater of the New Ear," set for April 28-30 at St. Ann's Warehouse in Brooklyn, where it will be taped for broadcast on Sirius Satellite Radio. Among the eight cast members are Meryl Streep, Steve Buscemi, Hope Davis and Philip Seymour Hoffman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2008
PICTURE "No Country for Old Men" DIRECTOR Joel Coen and Ethan Coen "No Country for Old Men" ACTOR Daniel Day-Lewis "There Will Be Blood" ACTRESS Marion Cotillard "La Vie en Rose" SUPPORTING ACTOR Javier Bardem "No Country for Old Men" SUPPORTING ACTRESS Tilda Swinton "Michael Clayton" FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM "The Counterfeiters" Austria ANIMATED FEATURE "Ratatouille" ADAPTED SCREENPLAY ...
NEWS
November 11, 2010
This year we'll find out how truly hip the academy is. Will members put "The Social Network" on their friends list? Will Oscar voters embrace the lesbian family in "The Kids Are All Right"? "Black Swan" has steamy girl-on-girl and solo action that would've made members blush in olden days. If traditional tastes end up reigning supreme, there are lots of quality contenders to hail, such as "The King's Speech," "True Grit" and "The Fighter. " It's early yet, so here we look at just some of the key awards.
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