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Ethan Coens

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
If she's such an angel, why are you lookin' for her at 4 in the morning? --Gabriel Byrne to Albert Finney in "Miller's Crossing" How can we describe the Coen Brothers? Tongue-in-cheek devotees of American sociopathology? Film noirettes? The sons of Hammett and Chandler, branded by Cain? Or just two guys who like to make movies where the camera races around below knee level? Pigeon-hole them where you will, they're unique.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges calls the Coen brothers "cool," as in "no big deal. They don't get excited too much. " Josh Brolin, who, like Bridges, has worked with the Coens on two movies now, takes Bridges' description and runs with it. "They're extremely low-key ? sometimes too low-key," Brolin says, laughing. "Ethan and I had dinner once. And I see him, he's got something under the table. And I go, 'Dude, what are you doing?' And I reached over and saw that he'd brought a book. He was reading a book.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges calls the Coen brothers "cool," as in "no big deal. They don't get excited too much. " Josh Brolin, who, like Bridges, has worked with the Coens on two movies now, takes Bridges' description and runs with it. "They're extremely low-key ? sometimes too low-key," Brolin says, laughing. "Ethan and I had dinner once. And I see him, he's got something under the table. And I go, 'Dude, what are you doing?' And I reached over and saw that he'd brought a book. He was reading a book.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | Michael Ordona
PERHAPS the most indelible character in Cormac McCarthy's novel "No Country for Old Men" is the unstoppable killer, Anton Chigurh. In the hands of Joel and Ethan Coen, he also becomes one of the screen's great monsters -- not only through Javier Bardem's chilling performance, but also through canny cinematic decisions. "In the novel, he's ultimately a mysterious character," says Ethan Coen, who teamed with his brother to write, direct and edit the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
If ever a movie begged for the resurrection of the drive-in, "Drive-Away Dykes" is it. A lesbian road-trip action sex comedy penned by writer-producer Ethan Coen ("Fargo") and his wife, film editor Tricia Cooke, "Drive-Away" promises all the laughs, thrills and mischief of the old double-bill sexploitation cinema. "Women on the road. All kinds of action," deadpans the tagline. I'm there.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Screenwriter and producer Ethan Coen has tried his hand at prose, and one can only wonder why. "Gates of Eden" is his first book, a volume of 14 short stories by half of the Coen Brothers team that has spawned the award-winning films "Barton Fink" and "Fargo" and the wonderfully idiosyncratic "Blood Simple" and "Raising Arizona." Some of the stories are built on compelling premises.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Susan King
Two sci-fi blockbusters and a raunchy box office hit comedy were nominated Monday for the Writers Guild of America Award. James Cameron, who earned a Directors Guild of America nomination last week, received a WGA nod in the original screenplay category for the sci-fi fantasy phenomenon "Avatar," which so far has made $1.3 billion worldwide. And Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman picked up a nomination in the adapted screenplay category for the acclaimed "Star Trek" reboot based on the original Gene Roddenberry series.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | PETER RAINER, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer
A friend of mine once described the films of Joel and Ethan Coen as the movie equivalent of eye-catching curios you stare at in an antique shop without ever wanting them in your home, and I know what he means. Their latest film, "The Hudsucker Proxy," set in 1958 but often deliberately evoking the '30s, is a $40-million curio. As gewgaws go, it's monumental, a ship-in-a-bottle in full launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Susan King
Two sci-fi blockbusters and a raunchy box office hit comedy were nominated Monday for the Writers Guild of America Award. James Cameron, who earned a Directors Guild of America nomination last week, received a WGA nod in the original screenplay category for the sci-fi fantasy phenomenon "Avatar," which so far has made $1.3 billion worldwide. And Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman picked up a nomination in the adapted screenplay category for the acclaimed "Star Trek" reboot based on the original Gene Roddenberry series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"If not now, when?" the Jewish sage Hillel famously asked, and with "A Serious Man" the Coen brothers have answered. Writer-directors Joel and Ethan have seized the opportunity afforded by the Oscar-winning success of "No Country for Old Men," to make their most personal, most intensely Jewish film, a pitch-perfect comedy of despair that, against some odds, turns out to be one of their most universal as well. Set in a very specific time and place -- the Jewish community in suburban Minneapolis circa 1967 -- that closely echoes the Coens' own background, "A Serious Man" is a memory piece re-imagined through the darkest possible lens.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | Michael Ordona
PERHAPS the most indelible character in Cormac McCarthy's novel "No Country for Old Men" is the unstoppable killer, Anton Chigurh. In the hands of Joel and Ethan Coen, he also becomes one of the screen's great monsters -- not only through Javier Bardem's chilling performance, but also through canny cinematic decisions. "In the novel, he's ultimately a mysterious character," says Ethan Coen, who teamed with his brother to write, direct and edit the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
If ever a movie begged for the resurrection of the drive-in, "Drive-Away Dykes" is it. A lesbian road-trip action sex comedy penned by writer-producer Ethan Coen ("Fargo") and his wife, film editor Tricia Cooke, "Drive-Away" promises all the laughs, thrills and mischief of the old double-bill sexploitation cinema. "Women on the road. All kinds of action," deadpans the tagline. I'm there.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Screenwriter and producer Ethan Coen has tried his hand at prose, and one can only wonder why. "Gates of Eden" is his first book, a volume of 14 short stories by half of the Coen Brothers team that has spawned the award-winning films "Barton Fink" and "Fargo" and the wonderfully idiosyncratic "Blood Simple" and "Raising Arizona." Some of the stories are built on compelling premises.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | PETER RAINER, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer
A friend of mine once described the films of Joel and Ethan Coen as the movie equivalent of eye-catching curios you stare at in an antique shop without ever wanting them in your home, and I know what he means. Their latest film, "The Hudsucker Proxy," set in 1958 but often deliberately evoking the '30s, is a $40-million curio. As gewgaws go, it's monumental, a ship-in-a-bottle in full launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"If not now, when?" the Jewish sage Hillel famously asked, and with "A Serious Man" the Coen brothers have answered. Writer-directors Joel and Ethan have seized the opportunity afforded by the Oscar-winning success of "No Country for Old Men," to make their most personal, most intensely Jewish film, a pitch-perfect comedy of despair that, against some odds, turns out to be one of their most universal as well. Set in a very specific time and place -- the Jewish community in suburban Minneapolis circa 1967 -- that closely echoes the Coens' own background, "A Serious Man" is a memory piece re-imagined through the darkest possible lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
The Coen brothers and their longtime music supervisor T Bone Burnett are producing a concert inspired by "Inside Llewyn Davis," their upcoming film set in the 1960s Greenwich Village folk music scene. The show, which is set for New York City's Town Hall on Sept. 29, will feature musical acts including Joan Baez, Marcus Mumford, Patti Smith and Jack White. Some of the film's cast, including Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan and John Goodman, will also perform in the concert, which is titled "Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of 'Inside Llewyn Davis.'" PHOTOS: Coen brothers: Movie mysteries revealed Based on Joel and Ethan Coens' original screenplay, "Inside Llewyn Davis" follows a week in the life of a struggling young folk singer (Isaac)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
If she's such an angel, why are you lookin' for her at 4 in the morning? --Gabriel Byrne to Albert Finney in "Miller's Crossing" How can we describe the Coen Brothers? Tongue-in-cheek devotees of American sociopathology? Film noirettes? The sons of Hammett and Chandler, branded by Cain? Or just two guys who like to make movies where the camera races around below knee level? Pigeon-hole them where you will, they're unique.
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