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BUSINESS
May 4, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
There isn't much David Goldberg, 44, hasn't already done. At 26 he sold his first start-up, Launch Media, for $12 million to Yahoo. Goldberg then served as general manager of Yahoo Music, and later left to work at Benchmark Capital as entrepreneur in residence. In 1999 he acquired a fledgling online survey company called SurveyMonkey and grew it into a billion-dollar business. He also happens to be married to Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, whom Forbes declared to be one of the most powerful women in the world.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
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OPINION
June 25, 2012 | Jim Newton
Jeff Hart is a scientist who knows the history of the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta better than most. He explains its emergence from the Ice Age, traces it through the arrival of the Spanish, recalls the figures of the California Gold Rush and points out the reeds that give shelter today to its wild fowl and fish. Last week, as we skimmed across the breezy waters of Steamboat Slough, a rivulet of the delta just south of Sacramento, he reflected on all that and argued for a "water ethic" that would re-envision humanity's relationship to its most basic substance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- With ethics scandals rocking the Capitol, Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as the new head of California's ethics watchdog agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Joann M. “Jodi” Remke, who is presiding judge of the State Bar Court, is Brown's choice to serve as chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. The appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel was appointed to the Federal Election Commission.
SPORTS
June 28, 1986
On the occasion of Don Sutton's 300th win, I am reminded of his remarkable work ethic as a young Dodger in the 1960s. One evening when he was not a particularly effective pitcher, he was taken out of the game in the middle innings. Instead of returning to the clubhouse, he went directly to the bullpen and worked for a considerable time on his then-imperfect curve. I don't recall seeing another pitcher demonstrate determination such as that. VINCE BURNS Santa Paula
BUSINESS
October 5, 1997
Welfare reform is doing more than just getting people into the work force; it is helping parents hand down a "work ethic" to their children ["Back on Her Feet," Aug. 19]. According to recent research by University of Chicago economist Casey B. Mulligan, there is a strong correlation between the success this generation of welfare recipients has in finding jobs and the likelihood that their children will be employed as adults 20 years later. A child's work ethic, the study found, is determined to a great degree by how much the parents actually work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1988 | VICTOR COHN, The Washington Post
For too many people near the end of life, the American way of death has become a slow, painful one. It has become encumbered by respirators and feeding lines, tubes stuffed into noses and throats and, sometimes, hands tied down to prevent a suffering patient's desperate removal of such devices. "Unfortunately, the quality of the additional life so skillfully sought can range from marginally tolerable to positively miserable."
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By James Barragan
The gig: Noel Massie is president of United Parcel Service's Southern California District, which has 20,000 employees and serves 144,000 customers in the area that includes the Southland, Hawaii and the southern tip of Nevada. On top of being responsible for a typical budget of $190 million, Massie oversees every aspect of the district's operation, including sales and customer relationships. Massie was installed as chair of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce this year. Early days: Massie grew up in an integrated East Oakland neighborhood, where his appreciation for people with diverse backgrounds would later apply to his work at UPS. Massie attended Berkeley High School for its math and science curriculum.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest outbreak of partisan bickering that has marked the issue, Republicans on the House Ethics Committee late Thursday announced a delay in public hearings on the punishment of Speaker Newt Gingrich because of Democratic complaints that the GOP was attempting a rush to judgment. The change was made to allow James M. Cole, the panel's special counsel, time to finish his written report on the ethics inquiry before a scheduled Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992
If Pat Buchanan represents the Judeo-Christian ethic, then God made a terrible mistake. WARREN HAMILTON JR. North Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
State senators and their aides spent Wednesday discussing ethics, but it wasn't all dry reading from handbooks. Ethics experts came up with several “hypotheticals for discussion.” They include: "Senator publishes Top 10 items on his personal bucket list on Facebook.  Lobbyist Employer's government affairs representative who is a FB friend of the Senator sees the Facebook posting and posts the following FB message, 'We can help you achieve...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A month after suspending three lawmakers convicted of or facing criminal charges, the state Senate on Wednesday is devoting the day to reviewing ethics rules and introspection about what constitutes proper behavior for public officials. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) has canceled all regular committee meetings so that every senator and staff member can attend sessions to refresh their memories on ethics rules. The unprecedented action comes just weeks after the Senate voted to suspend Democratic state Sens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- State Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) bemoaned the "subtle and insidious impact" of money in politics on Wednesday. His comments came after criminal investigations that have resulted in the unprecedented suspensions of three state senators, and in the midst of an election year that will likely feature tens of millions of dollars in campaign spending. Steinberg and Senate Republican leader Bob Huff (R-Diamond Bar) spoke with reporters near the Capitol after a series of conversations among senators about ethical guidelines and proper fund-raising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Stirred up by a series of Capitol scandals, four candidates for California secretary of state clashed at a forum Wednesday over who is best suited to restore voter faith in state government. Candidates Alex Padilla, Dan Schnur, Pete Peterson and Derek Cressman also challenged one another's ideas for reducing the corrupting influence of big money in state government. The event sponsor, the Sacramento Press Club, did not invite the three other candidates for the job . State Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A raft of bills to set tougher ethics rules for California politicians cleared their first legislative hurdle Tuesday as the state Senate prepared for a daylong refresher course on standards of conduct. Lawmakers say better adherence to existing rules and tougher restrictions in the future are needed to win back the public's trust after three state senators were charged with crimes. Eleven proposals approved by a Senate committee included a ban on fundraising during the end of legislative sessions, when decisions on many key issues are made; a reduction in the value of gifts that officials may accept; and a prohibition on such items as spa treatments, golf games, concert and professional sports tickets, theme park admissions and gift cards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Los Angeles' Ethics Commission is calling for an increase in public funding available to candidates seeking city office. The city currently provides $2 for each dollar a candidate raises in primary elections, and $4 for each dollar contributed in two-way runoffs in general elections. On Thursday, the panel recommended the city match be increased to $6 in both primary and general elections. "You want to allow people to talk to constituents, not just donors, and I think that increasing the match will reduce the amount of time you have to spend fundraising," said Jessica Levinson, vice president of the commission and a professor at Loyola Law School.
BOOKS
January 17, 1993
What Medved doesn't seem to understand is that Hollywood for good or ill is America and we don't need some self-appointed moralist to tell us how to think or what to see. I do believe that movies by and large have gotten worse over the last 12 years, but that's probably more because of the anything-for-a-buck ethic of the Reagan-Bush years than anything else. STEVE BARR CULVER CITY
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1987
You nasty-baiters have apparently struck a raw nerve. Judging from the first round of letters (Calendar Letters, June 28), the Nasty Ueber Alles credo is prevalent. Alas, so many places to jump into the fray. First, Lawrence Christon's assertion that the '80s have yet to be tagged with a moniker overlooks the disturbingly accurate potential of "The Age of Numbness." Sheila Benson alluded to the new uncivility in her review of "River's Edge," a movie that graphically explored loss of individuality and the outer boundaries of selfishness and insensitivity.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
The goal of the Los Angeles Times is to publish a newspaper of the highest quality. This requires The Times to be, above all else, a principled newspaper. Making it so is the responsibility of every staff member. In deed and in appearance, journalists at The Times must keep themselves - and the newspaper - above reproach. The ways a newspaper can discredit itself are beyond calculation; these guidelines do not purport to cover them all. It is up to staff members to master these general principles and, beyond that, to listen carefully to their individual sense of right and wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The arrest of a front-runner in the race for California secretary of state on corruption charges has made ethics a key issue for the seven candidates still in the contest. State Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) quit the race after his arrest last month on charges of taking payments in exchange for official favors and conspiring to illegally traffic in firearms. He has pleaded not guilty. As the remaining candidates focus on the best way to clean up Sacramento, Yee's stumble has thrown the June primary competition wide open.
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