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Ethiopia Armed Forces

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NEWS
October 13, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ethiopian army, the largest fighting force in sub-Saharan Africa, has collapsed in chaos, crippling the 12-year-old Marxist regime of President Mengistu Haile Mariam, local and Western specialists here say. In the last four weeks, the 300,000-member army has been battered by a much smaller force of rebels from the Tigre People's Liberation Front, one of two major guerrilla bands operating in the north of the country.
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NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
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NEWS
August 5, 1988
Ethiopia said its forces have captured a strategic rebel stronghold in mountainous northern Tigre province after fierce fighting. "The area was a fortress of the bandits who had also consolidated their positions in strategic positions in the surrounding areas," the state-owned Ethiopian News Agency reported.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An army of youthful and remarkably disciplined rebel soldiers was in full military command of this capital Tuesday, and in London agreement was reached under U.S. mediation for the rebels to rule the country until a new provisional government is formed. Troops of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) took control of Addis Ababa after a dawn assault that found the city almost entirely undefended by government forces. The anxiety of the city's 2.
NEWS
February 12, 1988
Ethiopian troops killed 20 people when thousands of drought victims at a food relief center refused to leave a northern region where rebels are fighting the Marxist government, rebel and relief officials said. The shooting occurred at Korem in Tigre province, where the drought victims gathered for emergency rations, the officials said. "Troops . . . started pushing them into trucks," said Haile Kiros Gessesse, an official of the rebel Tigre People's Liberation Front.
NEWS
April 21, 1988
Ethiopian rebel aid officials accused government troops of burning food stocks and wrecking water and electric power facilities as they retreated before a rebel offensive in drought-stricken northern Ethiopia. A spokesman for the Eritrean Relief Assn., based in Khartoum, Sudan, said the Ethiopian troops took what food they could when they retreated and burned what they could not carry.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Bob Geldof, the Irish pop star who raised millions in the West for famine relief here, returned to Ethiopia on Tuesday and managed to stir up a political tempest within minutes of his arrival by questioning the government's commitment to feeding its people and by criticizing its military spending.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
President said Friday that northern rebels had thrown Ethiopia into its "most critical situation" ever and called an emergency session of the parliament. In a radio and television address to the nation, Mengistu announced plans to combat the rebels with a reserve force that would include everyone under 60 years old in this African nation of 50 million people. "Everybody talks about peace and democracy, but the fact is that military strength is the decisive factor," he said.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
Government troops and secessionist rebels battled for a fourth day Sunday for Ethiopia's vital Red Sea port of Massawa, state radio said. The Sunday morning broadcast by the government-controlled station conflicted with a report Saturday night by the Eritrean People's Liberation Front that it had captured the city.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces moved into this capital city at dawn today, with a coordinated assault on the presidential palace, the international airport and other strategic points. Within hours, the rebels claimed they had taken over the capital, Reuters news service reported. The shooting broke out about 5:30 a.m. Rebel tanks moved up the hill in front of the palace and quickly scored a hit on the compound's ammunition dump, which was still burning two hours later.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front claimed Sunday to have surrounded Addis Ababa International Airport, less than five miles east of the city. The announcement was broadcast over rebel radio not long after heavy gunfire was heard from the direction of the airport. The broadcast warned international air carriers not to fly over the city or attempt to land at the airport.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government Saturday confirmed the fall of Asmara, the country's second-largest city, to Eritrean rebels--a development that may have finally brought an end to Africa's longest civil war, the 30-year Eritrean struggle for independence. The fall of Asmara came with the surrender late Friday of Ethiopia's 2nd Army--a force of 100,000 that was once considered the continent's best-trained and best-equipped fighting force--to troops of the Eritrean People's Liberation Front.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
President said Friday that northern rebels had thrown Ethiopia into its "most critical situation" ever and called an emergency session of the parliament. In a radio and television address to the nation, Mengistu announced plans to combat the rebels with a reserve force that would include everyone under 60 years old in this African nation of 50 million people. "Everybody talks about peace and democracy, but the fact is that military strength is the decisive factor," he said.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | From Reuters
With rebel groups closing in, embattled Ethiopian President Mengistu Haile Mariam has admitted his country is on the verge of collapse. Urging the people in an impassioned speech to Parliament on Thursday to rally and save the nation, Mengistu for the first time confirmed rebel reports of fierce fighting north of the capital, Addis Ababa, and the Red Sea province of Eritrea. "Citizens must realize . . .
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
Government troops and secessionist rebels battled for a fourth day Sunday for Ethiopia's vital Red Sea port of Massawa, state radio said. The Sunday morning broadcast by the government-controlled station conflicted with a report Saturday night by the Eritrean People's Liberation Front that it had captured the city.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ethiopian rebels said they killed or wounded at least 2,000 government troops in Ethiopia's northern provinces in the last two days and that fierce fighting is still raging. In Nairobi, Kenya, rebel spokesman Berhane Gebrechristos said that guerrillas of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front "annihilated two brigades"--more than 2,000 men--of the Ethiopian army near Dese, capital of Wollo province.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ethiopian army, the largest fighting force in sub-Saharan Africa, has collapsed in chaos, crippling the 12-year-old Marxist regime of President Mengistu Haile Mariam, local and Western specialists here say. In the last four weeks, the 300,000-member army has been battered by a much smaller force of rebels from the Tigre People's Liberation Front, one of two major guerrilla bands operating in the north of the country.
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