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Ethnic Food

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BUSINESS
June 25, 1985
With the acquisition of the Quik Wok group of restaurants, Pillsbury, owner of the Burger King chain, will be making its first foray into the ethnic fast-food market. Pillsbury reported last week that it was purchasing San Antonio-based Quik Wok, which operates nine outlets and had 1984 revenue of more than $4 million. Founded in 1980, Quik Wok features a Chinese menu with all entrees prepared on-site in woks. Quik Wok will be operated by Pillsbury's Burger King division.
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NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
No, it turns out, we can't all get along. In fact, we can't even sit down to dinner together. At least that's the findings of a recent survey by the polling organization Public Policy Polling. In a report titled “Food Issues Polarizing America” , it found stark - and often funny - divisions between Democrats and Republicans over food choices. Among the highlights: Democrats prefer bagels and croissants while Republicans like doughnuts (but who doesn't like doughnuts, really?
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NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MARYANN HAMMERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Maryann Hammers is a regular contributor to Valley Life
You can't make ash without kashk . That irrefutable fact was on the mind of the young Persian as he frantically rummaged through the dairy section of the Porter Ranch Alpha Beta. He was sent there by his wife, he explained, for some--how do you say it in English?-- kashk . He studied the sour cream, but it wasn't what he was looking for. He contemplated the yogurt. Still not quite right. A fellow shopper showed him a carton of half-and-half. Not even close.
TRAVEL
February 12, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
For Phoenix food tips, we turned to Andre Ethier, who summers in the right corner of Dodger Stadium and winters at his ranch in Chandler, 30 minutes south of Phoenix. The Arizona native is a devoted foodie - chasing down hole-in-the-wall joints and new, trendy places whenever he gets the chance. Raised in Phoenix's core, just two miles from where the Diamondbacks play, the 29-year-old Arizona State product has a local's knowledge of the city's food scene. The day he signed a new $11-million contract with the Dodgers, we took in dinner at his newest favorite, Latitude Eight, a little Thai place in Chandler's historic district that he said is on its own hitting streak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only a small slice of Los Angeles is on display Saturday and today, but it is a juicy, savory, aromatic slice, one that you bite into to find the richness of its people revealed. It is seven hot blocks of Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake, cordoned off so that someone like Woranut Nimnuansakun, a Thai immigrant, can stand over her fiery wok in a food booth furiously stirring a mountain of pad thai noodles. It is the courtyard of St.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ethnic food lovers have been bombarded with so much bad news lately, can a support group and 800 line be far behind? Chinese, Italian and now Mexican restaurant meals have all been skewered as unhealthy in recent surveys by researchers from the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the same spoilsports who bad-mouthed movie-theater popcorn. In the latest study, released last week by the Washington, D.C.-based consumer organization, chiles rellenos took the heat.
TRAVEL
February 12, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
For Phoenix food tips, we turned to Andre Ethier, who summers in the right corner of Dodger Stadium and winters at his ranch in Chandler, 30 minutes south of Phoenix. The Arizona native is a devoted foodie - chasing down hole-in-the-wall joints and new, trendy places whenever he gets the chance. Raised in Phoenix's core, just two miles from where the Diamondbacks play, the 29-year-old Arizona State product has a local's knowledge of the city's food scene. The day he signed a new $11-million contract with the Dodgers, we took in dinner at his newest favorite, Latitude Eight, a little Thai place in Chandler's historic district that he said is on its own hitting streak.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
No, it turns out, we can't all get along. In fact, we can't even sit down to dinner together. At least that's the findings of a recent survey by the polling organization Public Policy Polling. In a report titled “Food Issues Polarizing America” , it found stark - and often funny - divisions between Democrats and Republicans over food choices. Among the highlights: Democrats prefer bagels and croissants while Republicans like doughnuts (but who doesn't like doughnuts, really?
FOOD
February 18, 1998
As the fine Knopf Cooks American series has shown over the last several years, there is no simple definition of American cuisine. In those cookbooks, the authors explore ethnic food--Italian, Chinese or Latino, for instance--through the eyes of first-, second- and third-generation Americanswho not only adapt their native foods to American ingredients and tastes but who also change the way all Americans eat by expanding the national palate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
Artisans and food vendors are being invited to apply for booth spaces at the Tustin Tiller Days festival. Between 25,000 and 30,000 spectators are expected at the 36th annual event, which is scheduled for Oct. 7 to 9. The festival organizing committee is especially interested in receiving applications for sales of ethnic food and unusual handicrafts, said Randy Westrick of the city's Community Services Department. Nonprofit organizations and commercial vendors are eligible to apply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2005 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
Selling lettuce for 33 cents a head and hiring neighborhood youths turned down for jobs elsewhere, the 32nd Street Market just north of USC has softened some of the hard edges in the densely populated community for half a century. Generations of hungry but cash-strapped students knew they could wangle IOUs. Senior citizens flummoxed by impersonal big-box stores or chain supermarkets found the staff's old-fashioned gabbiness uplifting.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2003 | Karen Robinson-Jacobs, Times Staff Writer
Jack in the Box Inc. is pushing its new combo: gasoline and groceries to go with your burgers and fries. Since last fall, the San Diego-based chain has stepped up plans to open more fast-food restaurants adjacent to the company's Quick Stuff convenience stores -- mini-marts that stock items from diapers to detergent and where gasoline bays outside sell Shell, Arco and other brands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only a small slice of Los Angeles is on display Saturday and today, but it is a juicy, savory, aromatic slice, one that you bite into to find the richness of its people revealed. It is seven hot blocks of Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake, cordoned off so that someone like Woranut Nimnuansakun, a Thai immigrant, can stand over her fiery wok in a food booth furiously stirring a mountain of pad thai noodles. It is the courtyard of St.
FOOD
February 18, 1998
As the fine Knopf Cooks American series has shown over the last several years, there is no simple definition of American cuisine. In those cookbooks, the authors explore ethnic food--Italian, Chinese or Latino, for instance--through the eyes of first-, second- and third-generation Americanswho not only adapt their native foods to American ingredients and tastes but who also change the way all Americans eat by expanding the national palate.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1997 | SUSAN JAQUES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sitting in his sleek Melrose Avenue restaurant, Tommy Tang piles pieces of curried chicken, meekrob noodles and sprigs of fresh mint onto a bed of romaine lettuce, rolls it and dips it into a vinaigrette sauce. "If you eat Thai food every day, you automatically lose weight," says the chef and restaurateur in between bites. "I can eat like a pig and never gain weight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
It's not often one sees collard greens and chicken empanadas on the same plate. But then, that was the whole point. On Friday, the last day of Black History Month, staff, students and parents at Hillery T. Broadous Elementary School culminated four weeks of observance and study with a multicultural food and dress festival in the school's auditorium. "It's a way to bring the community together and to appreciate each other's cultures," said Broadous Principal Calvin Lloyd.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1995 | PAUL H. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Cruz Jr., owner of the R&G Meat Market in Huntington Park, started stocking up on pork legs in September, before the holiday rush pushed up the price for the succulent meat. Then he brought turrones, a sweet candy from Spain, and he began collecting sidras and other wines from around Latin America. Today, his carnecia's aisles are flooded with food and freshly baked bread, so Latino residents from around the area can find the ingredients necessary for a perfect Christmas meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | Compiled by Kathie Jenkins
Serious food is fine for the palate, but is it fun? These recently reviewed restaurants may not be considered sacred temples of gourmet dining, but you'll have a great time. Bite Size (3917 Riverside Drive, Toluca Lake, (818) 848-GOOD). How about a little lunch? Literally, a little lunch. Bite into a bantam burger (the buns are baked special), a Lilliputian falafel or even a diminutive dog. How about a peewee pizza? Or a teensy taco?
BUSINESS
March 11, 1996 | EALENA CALLENDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When George de la Torre took over his late father's fish cannery more than 20 years ago, he gambled that the company's future was in menudo, not mackerel. His first step was to eliminate the fish operation and devote the entire business to the manufacture of the popular Mexican stew, thinking it would be a sure seller in Los Angeles' large Mexican American community. What he didn't bargain for was that few people believed canned menudo could be as good as homemade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1996 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most of us want to make a difference, whether winning the Nobel Prize for chemistry or simply being a good parent. Those of us who review restaurants would like to believe we play a part in raising standards. Even if it is just a little bit. I cover San Fernando Valley and Orange County restaurants for this newspaper. These are not glamour beats, not restaurants where you'll spot Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg or Cindy Crawford at a nearby table.
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