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Ethnic Foods

NEWS
August 3, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You knew chai had gone mainstream when the sweetly spicy, milky tea brewed along the sides of dusty Himalayan roads started spilling into the cardboard cups of America. Today, there are chai Web sites, chai hotlines, chai fan clubs and chai associations. On food market shelves there's kosher chai, decaffeinated chai, chai concentrate and chai powder. There are chai lattes, chai punch, chai granita style, chai Popsicles and chai ice cream.
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NEWS
June 23, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddy Warman beams at the appetizer just placed before him at his restaurant, Girasoles, a trendy hangout for Mexican politicians. Grabbing a spoon, the public relations executive stuffs the crunchy, brown morsels into a soft taco. "This is like caviar," he gushes. But the $11.50 dish, a favorite of senators and expense-account executives, is hardly an imported delicacy.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Reacting to steady growth in the nation's Muslim population, suppliers of consumer goods from meat to cosmetics are moving to meet a growing demand for products that comply with Islamic dietary laws. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, where an estimated 400,000 Muslims live, the number of grocery stores specializing in Islamic food, known as halal--an Arabic word meaning "permitted"--have doubled over the last three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The masa was ready. A large bowl of thick cornmeal dough that holds together tamales and generations of Mexican families sat on the table, ready to be molded into the traditional Christmas staple. The meat had been slowly boiled, the chiles cooked and seasoned. The cornhusks were soaked in warm water, the rough leaves giving way to soft and translucent wrappers.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1997 | SUSAN JAQUES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sitting in his sleek Melrose Avenue restaurant, Tommy Tang piles pieces of curried chicken, meekrob noodles and sprigs of fresh mint onto a bed of romaine lettuce, rolls it and dips it into a vinaigrette sauce. "If you eat Thai food every day, you automatically lose weight," says the chef and restaurateur in between bites. "I can eat like a pig and never gain weight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
It's not often one sees collard greens and chicken empanadas on the same plate. But then, that was the whole point. On Friday, the last day of Black History Month, staff, students and parents at Hillery T. Broadous Elementary School culminated four weeks of observance and study with a multicultural food and dress festival in the school's auditorium. "It's a way to bring the community together and to appreciate each other's cultures," said Broadous Principal Calvin Lloyd.
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