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Ethnic Foods

NEWS
August 22, 2002 | Sorina Diaconsecu
Quench any attack of the munchies and expand your culinary horizons by sampling these fanciful snacks in the Sawtelle area: Fermented Beverages Neither yogurt nor soft drink but something in between, this concoction is a popular vending-machine staple in the land of the rising sun. Japanese and Korean kids get it delivered at home every day and are practically weaned on it.
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HEALTH
July 29, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly every culture has found some irresistible way to fry dough: In Israel, there are the jelly-filled sufganiyot; in China, a twisted dough stick known as you tiao; and then there are the funnel cakes of Pennsylvania Dutch country. We can thank Spanish explorers for the skinny, crispy treats called churros--sold throughout South- ern California, from Disneyland to historic Olvera Street in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A bill making it a misdemeanor to sell food products falsely labeled as halal, or sanctioned by Islamic law, was signed into law Monday by Gov. Gray Davis. Davis signed AB 1828, by Assemblyman Bill Campbell (R-Villa Park), during a news conference at the Islamic Cultural Center in Los Angeles. "Halal is the Islamic equivalent to the Jewish kosher, and therefore a sacred necessity for the Islamic faithful," Davis said.
NEWS
July 9, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign catches your eye first. It stands near the corner of Sunset and La Brea in Hollywood, a giant black square with a scramble of ethnic elements that look like they were blown from the streets below by the winds: There is the delicate scrawl of Persian, some English, a bit o' the Irish. Mashti Malone's Ice Cream, it says. Atop the sign a big ice cream cone leans precariously against a giant clover.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2002 | ELENA GAONA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a daily ritual bordering on the obsessive, she says, but Los Angeles homemaker Marina Lopez can't stay away from her local carniceria. Every day, she carefully studies the long glass cases filled with fresh meat at the small Westlake neighborhood store. On this particular Wednesday afternoon, her eyes stop at the beef tongue, but she quickly rules it too expensive.
NEWS
December 24, 2001 | LESLEE KOMAIKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In anticipation of the new year, dozens of members of Senshin Buddhist Temple near USC and their friends gathered to participate in the annual ritual called mochitsuki, or mochi pounding. The ancient process begins with high gluten rice--in this case, a thousand pounds of it--which is cleaned, steamed, beaten into a smooth, sticky dough, and finally transformed into small, round cakes of chewy, delicate mochi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To any Korean worth his salt, life without kimchi--the spicy pickled vegetables that appear at every Korean meal--is unthinkable. "Like marriage without sex," says Tong S. Suhr, a Los Angeles attorney and Koreatown gourmet whose love affair with kimchi spans more than six decades. "You just have to have it." Kimchi, unique to the Korean peninsula, has been around for centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proprietress of Seoul Bakery in Koreatown couldn't be more pleased. "What an honor it is to have the governor of California come to our little rice cake shop and sign this historic legislation," said Young-Hee Lee, resplendent in a gold-colored Korean traditional garment--hanbok--instead of her usual work clothes. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only a small slice of Los Angeles is on display Saturday and today, but it is a juicy, savory, aromatic slice, one that you bite into to find the richness of its people revealed. It is seven hot blocks of Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake, cordoned off so that someone like Woranut Nimnuansakun, a Thai immigrant, can stand over her fiery wok in a food booth furiously stirring a mountain of pad thai noodles. It is the courtyard of St.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In ethnically diverse Los Angeles, where culture and cuisine are as tightly linked as the ribs of a hickory-smoked slab, there's something of a food fight brewing. At issue: a near-doubling of the fees charged to food vendors who sell their native specialties at ethnically themed expos at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
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