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Ethnic Groups Bulgaria

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NEWS
August 22, 1989
Turkey announced that it will close its border with Bulgaria today in protest against what it called Sofia's "irresponsible" policy of seeking "to rid itself of the Turkish minority problem by expelling (ethnic Turks) under its own terms and assimilating the rest, who were more pliable." But Turkey said it is "ready to accept all of its kinsmen within the framework of a comprehensive agreement with Bulgaria."
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NEWS
August 23, 1989
The Bulgarian government accused Turkey of playing "a dirty political game" with its decision requiring that ethnic Turks immigrating from Bulgaria first obtain visas. However, the semiofficial Turkish news agency Anatolia said 522 ethnic Turks were allowed to cross without visas. The refugees say they are fleeing a harsh assimilation campaign.
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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of ethnic Turks demanding more rights clashed with security forces across northeastern Bulgaria last weekend, and at least two protesters died when troops opened fire, the official BTA news agency said Wednesday. A third person died of heart failure during the clashes, and three people believed to be ethnic Turks were injured, BTA said. Turkish newspapers reported Wednesday that 25 ethnic Turks were killed in the clashes, which occurred in northeastern Bulgaria, where most of the country's 900,000 ethnic Turks live.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of ethnic Turks demanding more rights clashed with security forces across northeastern Bulgaria last weekend, and at least two protesters died when troops opened fire, the official BTA news agency said Wednesday. A third person died of heart failure during the clashes, and three people believed to be ethnic Turks were injured, BTA said. Turkish newspapers reported Wednesday that 25 ethnic Turks were killed in the clashes, which occurred in northeastern Bulgaria, where most of the country's 900,000 ethnic Turks live.
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