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Ethnic Groups Iraq

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NEWS
April 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Iraq said Saturday that its forces killed thousands of Iranian troops and overran bases of Iranian-backed Kurdish rebels in northeast Iraq. Iranian warplanes bombed an Iraqi garrison in the region, Tehran radio reported, but Iran's news media had no immediate comment on the Iraqi victory claim. Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency reported that Iraqi forces were leveling the Kurdish town of Sayed Sadeq in Sulaymaniyah province and its that inhabitants are seeking refuge in nearby towns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Saddam Hussein's regime has expelled hundreds of ethnic Kurds and other non-Arab minorities to Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq in recent months despite repeated warnings from the U.N., officials say. Tens of thousands were forced to leave oil-rich areas under the Iraqi leader's control after the end of the Persian Gulf War in 1991, but the expulsions then slowed. The daily deportations have increased again in the past six months.
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NEWS
March 11, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Widespread rebellion and unrest in Iraq chewed Sunday at President Saddam Hussein's reins of authority, threatening the major oil center of Kirkuk in the north and sending a postwar flood of refugees over the Iranian border in the south, according to rebel leaders in exile. Sheik Abu Maitham Saghir, an Islamic fundamentalist, claimed in Beirut on Sunday that the uprising against Hussein's rule now involved 29 major Iraqi cities and had spread over three-quarters of Iraqi territory.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventeen months after Iraqi troops poured into this Kurdish enclave, Iraqi Arabs are again arriving in the northern region in droves. This time, however, they're coming as tourists. The sight of such visitors in the self-declared regional administration of Iraqi Kurdistan would have been unthinkable until recently. But contradictory U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. military mission to protect Kurds in northern Iraq nears an end, Kurdish leaders claimed Tuesday that the withdrawal may force them to sign a one-sided agreement with Saddam Hussein that will help extend his control throughout Iraq and entrench his dictatorship.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Saddam Hussein's regime has expelled hundreds of ethnic Kurds and other non-Arab minorities to Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq in recent months despite repeated warnings from the U.N., officials say. Tens of thousands were forced to leave oil-rich areas under the Iraqi leader's control after the end of the Persian Gulf War in 1991, but the expulsions then slowed. The daily deportations have increased again in the past six months.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventeen months after Iraqi troops poured into this Kurdish enclave, Iraqi Arabs are again arriving in the northern region in droves. This time, however, they're coming as tourists. The sight of such visitors in the self-declared regional administration of Iraqi Kurdistan would have been unthinkable until recently. But contradictory U.S.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Flying from Kirkuk to this provincial capital in northeast Iraq, one can see earthen fortifications, sprouting up like tiny volcanoes, along the edges of the main highway. The fortifications, positioned every couple hundred yards, with high dirt walls formed in a circle to protect the occupants, are outposts of Iraq's Popular Army. Even so, according to Iraqi officials and Western diplomats in Baghdad, the roads are not safe for Iraqi vehicles after dark--some say as early as 4 p.m.
OPINION
October 9, 2003 | Rajan Menon and Henri J. Barkey, Rajan Menon is a professor of international relations at Lehigh University, where Henri J. Barkey is chairman of the international relations department. Barkey was on the State Department's policy planning staff from 1998 to 2000.
The Bush administration is making a mistake by seeking Turkish soldiers for duty in Iraq. Confronted by a guerrilla war -- waged by Saddam Hussein loyalists and Islamic militants from outside Iraq -- and a U.S. Congress and public increasingly skeptical about the logic behind the war and its costs, the White House understandably wants to reduce the toll in blood and treasure being paid by the United States. But recruiting Turkey to help stabilize Iraq will create more problems than it solves.
WORLD
October 8, 2003 | Amberin Zaman and Laura King, Special to The Times
The Turkish parliament voted solidly Tuesday to authorize sending thousands of troops to Iraq, in a move chiefly designed to improve ties with Turkey's main ally, the United States. But members of the U.S.-appointed Iraqi Governing Council immediately signaled opposition to the deployment of Turkish troops in their country. Kurds, in particular, are concerned about Turkish influence in Kurdish areas of northern Iraq.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. military mission to protect Kurds in northern Iraq nears an end, Kurdish leaders claimed Tuesday that the withdrawal may force them to sign a one-sided agreement with Saddam Hussein that will help extend his control throughout Iraq and entrench his dictatorship.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Widespread rebellion and unrest in Iraq chewed Sunday at President Saddam Hussein's reins of authority, threatening the major oil center of Kirkuk in the north and sending a postwar flood of refugees over the Iranian border in the south, according to rebel leaders in exile. Sheik Abu Maitham Saghir, an Islamic fundamentalist, claimed in Beirut on Sunday that the uprising against Hussein's rule now involved 29 major Iraqi cities and had spread over three-quarters of Iraqi territory.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Iraq said Saturday that its forces killed thousands of Iranian troops and overran bases of Iranian-backed Kurdish rebels in northeast Iraq. Iranian warplanes bombed an Iraqi garrison in the region, Tehran radio reported, but Iran's news media had no immediate comment on the Iraqi victory claim. Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency reported that Iraqi forces were leveling the Kurdish town of Sayed Sadeq in Sulaymaniyah province and its that inhabitants are seeking refuge in nearby towns.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Flying from Kirkuk to this provincial capital in northeast Iraq, one can see earthen fortifications, sprouting up like tiny volcanoes, along the edges of the main highway. The fortifications, positioned every couple hundred yards, with high dirt walls formed in a circle to protect the occupants, are outposts of Iraq's Popular Army. Even so, according to Iraqi officials and Western diplomats in Baghdad, the roads are not safe for Iraqi vehicles after dark--some say as early as 4 p.m.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush strongly denied Sunday that he is trying to provoke the Iraqi regime into a showdown to boost his reelection campaign. Yet he also issued a stiff warning to Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein to comply with all U.N. resolutions. "Saddam Hussein needs to realize that the world will not ignore interference with these U.N. requirements.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truck drivers in this desert town measure Iraq's disintegration in miles--the fearsome miles they travel on the highway to Baghdad to deliver the meager goods that are all that is left of Jordan's once-thriving trade with its eastern neighbor. On the 14-hour desert drive, truckers must contend with half a dozen Iraqi army checkpoints, as well as army deserters who now roam the highway as armed marauders. They travel during daylight, in convoys of five or six, for protection.
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