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Ethnic Groups Los Angeles

NEWS
January 14, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once synonymous with racial tension and riots, Los Angeles has been a perilous place to practice ethnic coalition building. But recent grass-roots efforts crossing racial and ethnic boundaries suggest that demographic changes may be forcing communities to reassess that assumption.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prevalent frustration among Korean Americans is the feeling that African Americans harbor an unfocused resentment against them. Now, an unusual talk show on a Koreatown radio station is giving them a chance to find out first-hand. "Listening to African American Voices," the first Korean-language call-in program of its kind, features a black guest each Wednesday morning in the Koreatown studios of KBLA-AM (1580), better known as Radio Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
Assuming Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton survives New York, he faces another dangerous path through urban ethnic politics here in L.A. Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Jews, Armenians, Greeks and other groups are political players in this once predominantly white Protestant city that has become a magnet for minorities. And, there are groups within groups, factions within factions.
NEWS
April 29, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1992, Young Kim was a 73-year-old native Angeleno who, after a celebrated U.S. Army career that included combat in World War II and Korea, had turned his attention to community affairs. Kyung-Ja Lee, 38, was a filmmaker working on her second movie, a love story between a middle-class Korean woman and a Mexican mechanic in Los Angeles. Kyu M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year ago, after moving into her Mt. Washington home, Koina Freeman was struck by what she felt were divisions in her new neighborhood. She didn't find as much interaction among whites and Latinos in the neighborhood as she would have liked. "Something had to be done," Freeman said. So she delivered questionnaires to some 60 homes in the neighborhood, asking residents about their concerns.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Members of a new minority, black residents in South-Central Los Angeles, were complaining recently to their City Council member about how Latino immigrants were disrupting their neighborhood. Chickens clucking in back yards. Cars parked on front lawns. Soccer players commandeering parks. Ranchera music at all hours of the night. "It's a different culture, a different breed of people. They don't have the same values. You can't get together with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1995 | EDWARD J. BOYER, LOS ANGELES TIMES
It is not a question of if it will happen. The only question now is when will Los Angeles' shrinking African American population result in fewer black elected officials? "A lot of us have been handicapping this one for a long time," said veteran political consultant Chris Hammond. "The assumption is that somewhere down the road--I don't know if it will be the year 2000--we're going to lose a council seat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The steady influx of foreign investments into Los Angeles County and a population boom among the region's minorities is prompting the United Way of Los Angeles to refocus the aims and tactics of its fund-raising programs, a report by the charity showed Monday. Findings in the report--United Way's Environmental Scan 1990--show that 75% of all births in the county are to minorities, an increase that will make whites a minority in metropolitan Los Angeles in about three years.
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