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Ethnic Groups Sri Lanka

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July 27, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The gruesome remains smoldered outside the tea shop for more than 12 hours before finally being removed by police. It was the body of a young man with a gasoline-soaked truck tire bound to his chest and set ablaze. The flaming body was dumped along Sri Lanka's main coastal road for all to see, as a message from the nation's security forces, the old man who runs the tea shop explained, adding that to give his name would be to risk his life. The message: Don't fight us, or you will be next.
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NEWS
July 10, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, war has come to this small, beautiful place. At 8 a.m. one June day, Thirumadi Sangupillai, 12, was running down the road in her village on Sri Lanka's low-lying eastern coast to buy her mother some rice. She stepped on a land mine buried on the roadside, and the explosion blew off her right foot. The bright-eyed schoolgirl with braids is now confined to a bed in Ward 12 of the Batticaloa hospital. Her left leg is healing from ugly shrapnel wounds.
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NEWS
July 10, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, war has come to this small, beautiful place. At 8 a.m. one June day, Thirumadi Sangupillai, 12, was running down the road in her village on Sri Lanka's low-lying eastern coast to buy her mother some rice. She stepped on a land mine buried on the roadside, and the explosion blew off her right foot. The bright-eyed schoolgirl with braids is now confined to a bed in Ward 12 of the Batticaloa hospital. Her left leg is healing from ugly shrapnel wounds.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The gruesome remains smoldered outside the tea shop for more than 12 hours before finally being removed by police. It was the body of a young man with a gasoline-soaked truck tire bound to his chest and set ablaze. The flaming body was dumped along Sri Lanka's main coastal road for all to see, as a message from the nation's security forces, the old man who runs the tea shop explained, adding that to give his name would be to risk his life. The message: Don't fight us, or you will be next.
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