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Ethnic Groups

BUSINESS
January 27, 1988 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
California will continue to show much faster population growth than the nation through 1995 as immigrants leave home and baby boomers trade in singles bars for family cars, according to a new study by the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1986 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Saying that there "are no strangers in the community of faith," Archbishop Roger M. Mahony urged Los Angeles-area Roman Catholics to welcome immigrants as "an enrichment" to church life and said he will encourage priests to learn a second language.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
It's technically called an egg "donation. " But if you're a young Asian woman, donating your eggs to an infertile couple can fetch enough cash to buy a used car or perhaps a semester at college. The same market forces that drive the price of cotton, copper and other commodities - supply and demand - have allowed Asian women to command about $10,000 to $20,000 for their eggs, also known as gametes or ova. Women of other ethnic groups typically get about $6,000 when they can sell their eggs, but they often can't for lack of demand, according to donation agencies and fertility clinics.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year shopping spree for sophisticated arms from China, Poland and Yugoslavia, Myanmar's military is gearing up for a major offensive against ethnic insurgents based along the border with Thailand, according to Western diplomats. The military in Myanmar, formerly called Burma, is building roads, improving logistics and moving up ammunition in preparation for the offensive, which will begin in the dry season that starts late this month.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
The 12 burly men solemnly twirled and twisted, arms held high, dancing the tsamiko in a circle to the plinking bouzouki music of the Markogiannakis Orchestra. Cheering onlookers showered dollar bills on the sweating dancers in traditional Greek applause. Suddenly, as the guest of honor arrived, the music at Nikos Restaurant stopped. Then came thundering cheers: "Yasu leventi mou!"--Hail, my little brave one! And over and over: "Duu-kaa-kees! Duu-kaa-kees!" Up on stage, Michael S.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1988 | STEVE CHAWKINS, Times Staff Writer
After narrating the tale of yet another traveler stricken with a sudden loss but saved by his trusty credit card, the tough customer with the cauliflower nose might invoke an unfamiliar homily: "Arantz karteet toors mee yeller!" That's Armenian for "Don't leave home without it!"--and while it hasn't been selected as the advertising message for one of two new credit cards being marketed to Armenians in the United States, it might as well be.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Giving an invaluable boost to the Ukraine's drive for statehood, representatives of various ethnic groups agreed Saturday that independence from Moscow is the "only exit" from decades of want and discrimination. "To unmistakably say yes to an independent, democratic Ukraine means to emerge from the ruins to which the last empire of the world has brought us," the more than 1,000 delegates to the first All-Ukrainian Inter-Ethnic Congress declared in a resolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a third of the sworn officers in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department believe they are "undertrained" for their current jobs and half have been the subject of internal investigations during their careers, according to the first department survey of employee attitudes.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the rolling green hills surrounding Rwanda's second-largest city, thousands of peasants walked to the Huye soccer stadium Saturday for their first glimpse of the country's new leaders. The people perched on the stadium's crumbling walls and sat on the rough brown grass of the playing field as hawks circled overhead. It was cool and cloudy as the meeting began, and many people took shelter under umbrellas.
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Macedonia is dividing along ethnic lines, and it may be too late to stop it. Regardless of the outcome of ongoing peace negotiations among political leaders trying to halt a rebel insurgency, the divisions on the ground are becoming so stark that it is hard to imagine how the nation's two main ethnic groups will be able to live together again.
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