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BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Occidental Petroleum Corp. said it will add its petrochemical business to a joint venture between Lyondell Petrochemical Co. and Millennium Chemicals Inc. The agreement creates one of the world's largest makers of ethylene, the chemical most widely used to make plastics, and derivatives used in products ranging from antifreeze to electronic equipment. The combined company, called Equistar, will have assets valued at $7 billion and about $6 billion in annual revenue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to produce tomatoes that do not ripen on the vine, during transit after they are picked and during storage. The technique could lead to less spoilage and to fresher, better tasting tomatoes. Tomatoes, as well as many other fruits, vegetables and flowers, trigger ripening by releasing a colorless, odorless gas called ethylene. Many growers and shippers now pick tomatoes while they are green to reduce damage during handling.
FOOD
January 27, 1994
The problem with buying fruits and vegetables in bulk is that you don't always use them fast enough to justify the savings. Evert-Fresh bags are transparent plastic bags lined with processed Japanese oya stone, a cousin of zeolite, which absorbs the ethylene gases that cause discoloration in fruits and vegetables (and flowers, for that matter), extending their life for weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
California researchers have isolated a gene that plays a key role in the ripening process of fruits and vegetables. The discovery could lead to new ways to reduce spoilage of the crops, and thus to get fresher produce to customers. In the United States, almost 50% of fruits and vegetables are eventually lost as a result of spoilage caused by premature ripening, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Cal-Compack Foods Inc. in Santa Ana has long been known for the chili powder it produces. But Thursday, the firm gained public attention for a different reason: The small manufacturer of food ingredients was listed among 205 industrial plants that release unregulated amounts of dangerous chemicals, some that are suspected carcinogens, into the atmosphere. The list, based on a preliminary report compiled by the Environmental Protection Agency, was released by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles)
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Behind a dirt bunker in back of the Baxter Pharmaseal plant sits a giant drum of ethylene oxide, a highly flammable, cancer-causing gas that company officials say is the only substance they know of for sterilizing disposable hospital equipment. Every 24 hours, five days a week, 600 pounds of the chemical pass through an underground pipeline to four vacuum chambers inside the plant, where the gas permeates the packaging of such items as oxygen masks, surgical trays and urinary drainage bags.
FOOD
January 27, 1994
The problem with buying fruits and vegetables in bulk is that you don't always use them fast enough to justify the savings. Evert-Fresh bags are transparent plastic bags lined with processed Japanese oya stone, a cousin of zeolite, which absorbs the ethylene gases that cause discoloration in fruits and vegetables (and flowers, for that matter), extending their life for weeks.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Occidental Petroleum Corp. said it will add its petrochemical business to a joint venture between Lyondell Petrochemical Co. and Millennium Chemicals Inc. The agreement creates one of the world's largest makers of ethylene, the chemical most widely used to make plastics, and derivatives used in products ranging from antifreeze to electronic equipment. The combined company, called Equistar, will have assets valued at $7 billion and about $6 billion in annual revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State job-safety inspectors have fined a Tarzana hospital nearly $5,000 after a technician was exposed to a suspected cancer-causing gas leaking from a machine used to sterilize surgical instruments. But Cal-OSHA officials dropped more than $12,000 in additional fines against Tarzana Regional Medical Center after deciding that they could not prove that the hospital didn't have proper mechanical controls to prevent future leaks, a spokesman said. The hospital was cited Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to produce tomatoes that do not ripen on the vine, during transit after they are picked and during storage. The technique could lead to less spoilage and to fresher, better tasting tomatoes. Tomatoes, as well as many other fruits, vegetables and flowers, trigger ripening by releasing a colorless, odorless gas called ethylene. Many growers and shippers now pick tomatoes while they are green to reduce damage during handling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State job-safety inspectors have fined a Tarzana hospital nearly $5,000 after a technician was exposed to a suspected cancer-causing gas leaking from a machine used to sterilize surgical instruments. But Cal-OSHA officials dropped more than $12,000 in additional fines against Tarzana Regional Medical Center after deciding that they could not prove that the hospital didn't have proper mechanical controls to prevent future leaks, a spokesman said. The hospital was cited Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
California researchers have isolated a gene that plays a key role in the ripening process of fruits and vegetables. The discovery could lead to new ways to reduce spoilage of the crops, and thus to get fresher produce to customers. In the United States, almost 50% of fruits and vegetables are eventually lost as a result of spoilage caused by premature ripening, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Behind a dirt bunker in back of the Baxter Pharmaseal plant sits a giant drum of ethylene oxide, a highly flammable, cancer-causing gas that company officials say is the only substance they know of for sterilizing disposable hospital equipment. Every 24 hours, five days a week, 600 pounds of the chemical pass through an underground pipeline to four vacuum chambers inside the plant, where the gas permeates the packaging of such items as oxygen masks, surgical trays and urinary drainage bags.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Cal-Compack Foods Inc. in Santa Ana has long been known for the chili powder it produces. But Thursday, the firm gained public attention for a different reason: The small manufacturer of food ingredients was listed among 205 industrial plants that release unregulated amounts of dangerous chemicals, some that are suspected carcinogens, into the atmosphere. The list, based on a preliminary report compiled by the Environmental Protection Agency, was released by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2008 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Vinyl shower curtains sold at major retailers across the country emit toxic chemicals that have been linked to serious health problems, according to a report released Thursday by a national environmental organization. The curtains contained high concentrations of chemicals that are linked to liver damage as well as damage to the central nervous, respiratory and reproductive systems, said researchers for the Virginia-based Center for Health, Environment & Justice.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997 | (John O'Dell)
Fluor Corp. said Thursday that its Fluor Daniel unit has formed a joint venture with Boston-based engineering services firm Stone & Webster to pursue petrochemical industry construction project jobs. The joint venture, to be headquartered in Houston, will concentrate on the ethylene industry. Ethylene is a major petrochemical feedstock used to manufacture a variety of derivatives, including plastics and solvents.
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