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Etm Entertainment Network Inc

BUSINESS
June 20, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
ETM Entertainment Network Inc., the Costa Mesa start-up that pushed its technology to transform the ticketing business, said Monday that it has run out of money and has handed over all of its business contracts to its biggest foe, industry giant Ticketmaster. Tickets for the Los Angeles Dodgers, the San Diego Sports Arena and a number of other teams and events that helped give ETM credibility will be handled by Ticketmaster while the Pasadena company tries to renegotiate those contracts.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following the lead of the Los Angeles Dodgers, the New York Mets have signed a deal with a budding Orange County company to sell the team's tickets through electronic kiosks in grocery stores and shopping malls. The three-year contract represents a strategic victory for ETM Entertainment Network Inc., a small Costa Mesa firm, over Ticketmaster, the nation's leading ticket company.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electronic ticketing firm ETM Entertainment Network has denied the charges that it illegally appropriated trade secrets when it copied a former executive's 7,000-name Rolodex. Peter Schniedermeier, president of the Costa Mesa firm, claims that Ralph Dennis Finfrock had no objection when the staff asked to copy the massive phone list.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1996
ETM Entertainment Network, which sold Pearl Jam tickets by telephone last year when the rock act boycotted Ticketmaster, thinks grocery shoppers may be ready to bag some tickets at the market. ETM said Wednesday that it will place interactive electronic kiosks in some of Vons Cos. Inc.'s supermarkets this summer to test the concept. Kiosks would be placed in select Vons and Pavilions stores in Orange and Los Angeles counties under the agreement.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Ana-based ETM Entertainment Network said Thursday it will appeal a jury verdict awarding $15 million in damages to a former employee who accused the event ticketing company of stealing trade secrets. Privately held ETM said that it has insurance against such verdicts and that the company will operate as usual while the award is appealed.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual trademark case, a former executive of ETM Entertainment Network filed a lawsuit accusing the ticketing concern of misappropriating trade secrets by copying his 7,000-name Rolodex after he submitted his resignation. Ralph Dennis Finfrock, who resigned last month as president of international sales at the Costa Mesa company, said ETM executives refused to let him depart with his Rolodex.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual trademark case, a former executive of ETM Entertainment Network filed a lawsuit accusing the ticketing concern of misappropriating trade secrets--copying his 7,000-name Rolodex after he submitted his resignation. Ralph Dennis Finfrock, who resigned last month as president of international sales at the Costa Mesa company, said ETM executives refused to let him depart with his Rolodex.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1998 | (P.J. Huffstutter)
Two former employees of ETM Entertainment Network have settled their lawsuit accusing the company of misappropriating trade secrets by copying one of their Rolodexes with 7,000 names, officials said Friday. The suit, filed last month in Superior Court in Santa Ana, said the Costa Mesa ticketing firm copied Ralph Dennis Finfrock's Rolodex after he resigned to join a rival firm. Deals of the settlement were not disclosed. Finfrock could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Paul Marsh wants to see a movie, he doesn't run, or even walk, to the nearest box office. He just picks up the phone. The entertainment analyst at New York-based Cowen & Co. said he uses an automated phone-in service to buy tickets before leaving his house. "I'll be damned if I'm going to go to a movie and stand in line without any assurance of getting a ticket," Marsh said. Although the box office still accounts for the vast majority of the $5 billion in tickets sold at U.S.
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