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NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The quest for eternal youth is, well, eternal. Think Peter Pan, or those folks in "Nip/Tuck" who routinely go under the knife. But what about the perennially pubescent Clara in E.T.A. Hoffmann's story of "The Nutcracker"? Forever young, she leaps, twirls and lunges around a gift-festooned stage every Christmas, when, in real life, many a Clara is quite beyond the age of wide-eyed innocence.
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NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The quest for eternal youth is, well, eternal. Think Peter Pan, or those folks in "Nip/Tuck" who routinely go under the knife. But what about the perennially pubescent Clara in E.T.A. Hoffmann's story of "The Nutcracker"? Forever young, she leaps, twirls and lunges around a gift-festooned stage every Christmas, when, in real life, many a Clara is quite beyond the age of wide-eyed innocence.
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NEWS
December 9, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
CREATED for England's Opera North in 1992 as "The Nutcracker," but revised and retitled a decade later, choreographer Matthew Bourne's "Nutcracker!" wants to be a satiric look at what the have-not children of this world see as the big lie of Christmas cheer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
CHOREOGRAPHER Matthew Bourne is best known for flipping his sources: taking a ballet, an opera, a feature film and switching period, location, character-gender until it yields a powerful, newly engaging dance drama. But Tim Burton's 1990 film "Edward Scissorhands" seemed to need no radical reinterpretation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Beyond its steamy fusion of dance drama, grand opera and film noir, Matthew Bourne's "The Car Man" is a sardonic fantasy of 20th century mid-America--a place where stud males are as abundant as auto parts, where social dances are one part bare-knuckled aggression to two parts hip-pumping foreplay, and where any kind of softness, sensitivity or vulnerability is doomed to extinction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, Kristin Hohenadel writes on arts and culture
Matthew Bourne has been to Broadway and back, and he can't wait to get to L.A. "It's nice coming to a place where people are very caring and welcoming," says the choreographer by phone from London. It has been two years since the U.S. premiere--at the Music Center's Ahmanson Theatre--of Bourne's irreverent version of "Swan Lake," in which he made male beasts of the sacred swans and brought dance theater to the masses. "The audiences were incredibly warm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1997 | Kristin Hohenadel, Kristin Hohenadel is a writer and editor who lives in Paris
It's an unusually fine spring morning, and Matthew Bourne is in what passes for supreme commander mode. Assembled in front of him, on the floor of a rehearsal studio at the London Theatre Centre, are his troops: the members of his own Adventures in Motion Pictures dance company. Bourne and AMP have already established one beachhead--they've managed to turn their update of the 100-year-old "Swan Lake" into a six-month phenomenon in London's dog-eat-dog West End theater district.
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