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Eugene E Habiger

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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under intense pressure to act more aggressively to plug leaks and tighten security at the nation's nuclear weapon facilities, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson named a retired four-star Air Force general as the department's first "security czar"--only hours after meeting him Wednesday. Gen. Eugene E. Habiger, who last served as commander in chief of the U.S.
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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under intense pressure to act more aggressively to plug leaks and tighten security at the nation's nuclear weapon facilities, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson named a retired four-star Air Force general as the department's first "security czar"--only hours after meeting him Wednesday. Gen. Eugene E. Habiger, who last served as commander in chief of the U.S.
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NEWS
January 10, 2000 | From the Washington Post
After holding off for nearly two months, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson has sent Congress his plan for a new, semiautonomous agency to run his department's nuclear weapons programs. The plan sent Friday calls for the director of the new National Nuclear Security Administration, who will also serve as an undersecretary of Energy, to be appointed and confirmed by March 1.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two highly classified computer hard drives containing nuclear weapons data have disappeared from a vault in the heavily guarded weapons design division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, officials said Monday. The disclosure marks another severe embarrassment for the Department of Energy, which owns the New Mexico lab, and for the University of California, which manages it. Critics in Congress and elsewhere long have accused the lab of lax handling of national security secrets.
WORLD
May 25, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Russian strategic arms deal signed Friday in Moscow has won praise around the globe, yet the agreement says nothing about a class of atomic weapons that experts believe poses the greatest threat: the smaller devices called tactical nuclear weapons. Thousands of these arms are scattered throughout Russia, in the form of missile warheads, artillery shells, aircraft bombs and land mines.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Alamos National Laboratory suspended six managers and senior scientists Tuesday as part of a widening criminal investigation into the disappearance of two computer hard drives filled with nuclear weapon secrets, Energy Department officials said. Among those placed on leave with pay is the director of the lab's Nuclear Emergency Security Team, a little-known group that assists the FBI in investigations of terrorist threats involving nuclear weapons, officials said.
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