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Eugene O Neil

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
On March 15, 1956, when Jose Quintero took the elevator to the fourth floor of the Lowell Hotel in New York City, he was on his way to a meeting that would change his life. He was going to meet Carlotta Monterey O'Neill, the widow of playwright Eugene O'Neill, to ask permission for the fledgling Circle in the Square theater in Greenwich Village to stage a revival of O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh." The play had premiered on Broadway in 1946 to a disappointing reception--and none of O'Neill's plays had been staged in the United States since.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
On March 15, 1956, when Jose Quintero took the elevator to the fourth floor of the Lowell Hotel in New York City, he was on his way to a meeting that would change his life. He was going to meet Carlotta Monterey O'Neill, the widow of playwright Eugene O'Neill, to ask permission for the fledgling Circle in the Square theater in Greenwich Village to stage a revival of O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh." The play had premiered on Broadway in 1946 to a disappointing reception--and none of O'Neill's plays had been staged in the United States since.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
The Wooster Group and New York City Players tackle Eugene O'Neil's "Glencairn" plays — "Bound East for Cardiff" (1914), "The Long Voyage Home" (1917) and "The Moon of the Caribbees" (1918). Together, the tales of roughousing sailors take on a poignant, lonely resonance. This performance features cast members from both companies directed by Richard Maxwell. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 Thu.-Sat, 3 p.m. Sat.-Sun. $45 and $50. http://www.redcat.org.
BOOKS
October 1, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
A haphazard collection of Malaprops and misplaced modifiers, good for a quick laugh on a long plane ride. Some of these verbal pratfalls are decidedly stale, i.e. the one about Eugene O'Neil winning a "Pullet Surprise." The funniest chapter is devoted to headlines with double meanings their writers never anticipated (SURVIVOR OF SIAMESE TWINS JOINS PARENTS), but a distasteful clutch of "Welfare Bloopers" seems to mock the poor and functionally illiterate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Author Jane Scovell will sign her book, "Oona: Living in the Shadows: A Biography of Oona O'Neil Chaplin," at 7 tonight at Barnes & Noble, 731 N. San Fernando Blvd., Burbank, (818) 558-1383. Scovell, who also has written biographies of Elizabeth Taylor and Kitty Dukakis, now details the life of the woman who was the daughter of playwright Eugene O'Neil and the wife of entertainer Charlie Chaplin. Also, the store will hold a book fair for Children's Hospital of Los Angeles 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
SPORTS
September 12, 1993 | From Associated Press
Oregon quarterback Danny O'Neil passed for 316 yards and three touchdowns Saturday, but the heavily favored Ducks had to hold on for a 35-30 victory over Montana at Eugene, Ore. O'Neil completed 21 of 28 passes as Oregon (2-0) took a 28-3 lead in the first half. But the Oregon defense had difficulty containing Montana's fleet sophomore quarterback, Dave Dickenson, whose six-yard touchdown pass to Eugene native Mike Erhardt cut the lead to 35-30 with 1:55 left.
SPORTS
September 4, 1993 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Danny O'Neil is a survivor. Quarterbacks have come and gone at Oregon the last couple years. Some toted impressive credentials. Some even had close family ties to the program. They kept coming and coming, trying to unseat O'Neil. But no one could seem to yank the chair from under him. "That job was mine and I wasn't going to let anyone take it away from me," said O'Neil, a Mater Dei graduate who will lead the Ducks in their season opener against Colorado State this afternoon at Ft.
OPINION
November 5, 2000 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is an executive with an e-services consultancy
You hear it time and again: After a lifetime as a movie star, Gregory Peck is a remarkably regular guy. Yes, he clearly enjoys the trappings of success, but he is seemingly unaffected by fame. Now 84, he is polite, engaging and full of humor. These days, Peck describes himself as retired and focuses much of his energy on his role as honorary chair of the Los Angeles Library Foundation, which supports the L.A.
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