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Eugene O Neill Theatre Center

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN
We talk about her new script for a few minutes. It's the most personal thing she has ever written, her way of saying goodby to a dear friend and moving on. Then she cuts to the bottom line. "Is it a play?" It's the central question at the O'Neill, a worthier question than the one that necessarily concerns most American theater people during the regular season: "Is it a hit?" Behind it stands a larger question: "What is a play?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN
We talk about her new script for a few minutes. It's the most personal thing she has ever written, her way of saying goodby to a dear friend and moving on. Then she cuts to the bottom line. "Is it a play?" It's the central question at the O'Neill, a worthier question than the one that necessarily concerns most American theater people during the regular season: "Is it a hit?" Behind it stands a larger question: "What is a play?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1991 | SUSAN KING
Will Ned Eisenberg be the next Eugene O'Neill? Or perhaps the next Tennessee Williams? Or the next Neil Simon? The jury is still out, but the future looks bright for Eisenberg, who plays Anthony Fanelli on the NBC series "The Fanelli Boys." Eisenberg's been receiving boffo notices for his play "You Gotta Sing for Your Supper," currently at the Beverly Hills Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
While Broadway flocks to see Lily Tomlin in "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe," Paris lines up to see another Lily. It's a new comedy by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Gredy entitled "Lily et Lily." Variety's man in Paris calls it "a slam-bang French farce to which audiences react as though under a laughing gas attack." The setting is Hollywood in the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES
It doesn't happen often, but sometimes, even with a videocassette recorder, one cannot harvest all the riches that television spews forth in a given evening. Tonight is such an occasion. There are first-rate dramas on ABC and PBS, "Johnny Bull" and "Painting Churches," the conclusion of the sometimes exciting miniseries "On Wings of Eagles" on NBC, and an uncut presentation of the Academy Award-winning film "On Golden Pond" on KTLA Channel 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Japan's Grand Kabuki has returned to America, to admiring reviews--with reservations. Clive Barnes of the New York Post found the company's opening program at the Metropolitan Opera (to be seen Aug. 7-11 at Royce Hall, UCLA) "unforgettable." He was impressed by the last play, a love/death drama called "Kasane," starring the company's great onnagata (male actress), Tamasaburo. Here was "the conflagration of the true Kabuki."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
One can't say that Peter O'Toole is back on Broadway because O'Toole has never acted on Broadway before. ("Nobody asked me.") Anyway, he's there, playing Henry Higgins in a revival of "Pygmalion" that seems to have amused even those critics who couldn't muster up much respect for it. Frank Rich of the New York Times felt that everything about the event, from O'Toole's intermittent boredom to the elegant yet tatty scenery, "defined the West End matinee. This is theater to sip Earl Grey tea by."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1987 | Don Shirley and Sylvia Drake
It's just a coincidence, of course. The Mark Taper Forum has won the $50,000 Jujamcyn Theaters Award--little more than a month after Jack Viertel left his job as Taper dramaturge and joined the Jujamcyn Theater Organization, a Broadway producing company, as its creative director. "Don't you think $50,000 is a good ransom?" joked Taper artistic director Gordon Davidson, when asked about the Viertel connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Basically, I've had to unlearn 24 years of post-feminist training," said Jon Cryer of his role in Howard Korder's "Boys' Life" (opening Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center). "The story with Jack is that he's in a perpetual state of arrested adolescence. He's still a kid--that vicious kid you remember from when you were little. He's very misogynist, his major motivation is anger. And that anger takes its toll on his friends."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | Nancy Churnin
"Steel Magnolias," the off-Broadway hit and soon-to-be movie about five women who bare their souls and wicked wit in a Louisiana beauty shop, may not be coming to San Diego's Civic Theatre after all. The producers put on hold plans for the road show, starring Barbara Rush and Marion Ross, after the play was panned when it opened in San Francisco's cavernous Curran Theatre. The critics fired some well-earned barbs at the frankly sentimental but true story--it's a "Terms of Endearment" with a twist of Southern Comfort.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | Nancy Churnin
It began with Peter Finch and Rod Taylor and continues with the likes of Mel Gibson, Judy Davis and director Peter Weir. Now, the Australian invasion of American culture continues quietly with the visit of John Clark, director of the National Institute for Dramatic Art (NIDA)--the internationally recognized dramatic institute in Sidney. Clark will direct the San Diego premiere of "Away," by Australian playwright Michael Gow, as part of a theater exchange with UC San Diego at the Warren Theatre on June 7-11.
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