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Eugene Scalia

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NEWS
October 17, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate committee Tuesday narrowly approved the controversial nomination of Eugene Scalia to become the Labor Department's top lawyer, setting up a potentially bruising fight on the Senate floor. The Health, Education and Labor Committee voted, 11 to 10, for Scalia to become the department's solicitor, dividing equally along party lines. Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont, the chamber's only independent, cast the deciding vote. Democrats, led by committee Chairman Edward M.
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NATIONAL
January 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Eugene Scalia, the Labor Department's top lawyer whose nomination was opposed by labor unions, is stepping down. President Bush tapped Scalia as Labor solicitor in spring 2001, but Democrats who controlled the Senate blocked a vote on his nomination over union objections to his opposition of workplace safety regulations. Bush elevated Scalia, the son of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to the job in January 2002 when Congress was in recess, bypassing a Senate vote.
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NATIONAL
January 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Eugene Scalia, the Labor Department's top lawyer whose nomination was opposed by labor unions, is stepping down. President Bush tapped Scalia as Labor solicitor in spring 2001, but Democrats who controlled the Senate blocked a vote on his nomination over union objections to his opposition of workplace safety regulations. Bush elevated Scalia, the son of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to the job in January 2002 when Congress was in recess, bypassing a Senate vote.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate committee Tuesday narrowly approved the controversial nomination of Eugene Scalia to become the Labor Department's top lawyer, setting up a potentially bruising fight on the Senate floor. The Health, Education and Labor Committee voted, 11 to 10, for Scalia to become the department's solicitor, dividing equally along party lines. Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont, the chamber's only independent, cast the deciding vote. Democrats, led by committee Chairman Edward M.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) predicted Sunday that Eugene Scalia, President Bush's nominee as Labor Department solicitor, will be denied confirmation, and the White House stepped up a behind-the-scenes campaign on Scalia's behalf. The solicitor is responsible for defending department regulations in court.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The Securities and Exchange Commission won't be able to enforce new corporate governance rules for mutual funds until after a lawsuit opposing the measures is heard, according to a federal court order Wednesday. The Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit stayed the SEC rules, granting a motion brought by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush may act on his own to install controversial nominees at the Labor and State departments if the Democratic-led Senate refuses to vote on them this week. Senior administration officials said Monday they are exploring ways to give Otto Reich and Eugene Scalia temporary appointments during Congress' recess. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Bush has not made a final decision but is likely to issue recess appointments if the Senate doesn't act.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Eugene Scalia, President Bush's nominee as the Labor Department's top lawyer, defended his opposition to workplace-safety regulations at a Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday. "For a lawyer to shade or slant his legal advice to advance a private agenda is among the gravest betrayals of his solemn duty as an attorney," said Scalia, a Washington labor lawyer and son of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
OPINION
January 14, 2002
People who develop a type of injury caused by such repetitive actions as chopping chicken carcasses or hammering away at computer keyboards cannot sue their employers to force workplace accommodations under the Americans With Disabilities Act, the Supreme Court ruled last week.
OPINION
February 10, 2003
Arianna Huffington's twin obsessions with SUVs and CEOs are both wearing thin. In "Once Again, We're Being Railroaded" (Commentary, Feb. 6), she goes off the deep end with her latest hyperbolic broadside against CEOs. This time her villain is John Snow, the new Treasury secretary, in a column that is remarkable both for its vitriol and complete lack of substance. For example, she attacks Snow because his company, CSX, attempted to increase its profits by reducing unnecessary expenses such as out-of-control health-care benefits and life insurance benefits (since when is a company required to provide life insurance to all of its employees?
BUSINESS
February 27, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to call attention to an "epidemic" of repetitive-stress injuries among blue-collar workers, a national labor union filed a federal complaint Tuesday alleging hazardous working conditions at a Pilgrim's Pride Corp. chicken plant in Texas.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like his father, conservative Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Eugene Scalia prompts a strong reaction. In the eyes of labor groups and occupational safety experts, Scalia, 38, is a flat-out "danger" to the safety of U.S. workers. They see a lawyer who has worked for the last decade on behalf of big business, someone who has dismissed ergonomic studies and the rules generated by them as "junk science."
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