Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEugenia Zukerman
IN THE NEWS

Eugenia Zukerman

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A little excitement materialized at the end of the Friday concert by the trio of flutist Eugenia Zukerman, contrabassist Gary Karr and pianist Harmon Lewis in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts. Genuine musical competition and technical risk-taking occupied the stage then, as Zukerman and Karr edgily and enthusiastically alternated virtuoso solos in Giovanni Bottesini's Fantasy on themes from "La Sonnambula." Adrenaline flowed, and not only on the stage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD
Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl was all chamber-scale calm after the season-opening salvo of Beethoven's Ninth. Maybe it was too calm--too intimate, too stylistically diffuse--especially for the great outdoors. The twin performance of guitarist Angel Romero and flutist Eugenia Zukerman, who was filling in for an ailing Jean-Pierre Rampal, amounted to a whole that was less than the sum of its parts.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD
Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl was all chamber-scale calm after the season-opening salvo of Beethoven's Ninth. Maybe it was too calm--too intimate, too stylistically diffuse--especially for the great outdoors. The twin performance of guitarist Angel Romero and flutist Eugenia Zukerman, who was filling in for an ailing Jean-Pierre Rampal, amounted to a whole that was less than the sum of its parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A little excitement materialized at the end of the Friday concert by the trio of flutist Eugenia Zukerman, contrabassist Gary Karr and pianist Harmon Lewis in Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts. Genuine musical competition and technical risk-taking occupied the stage then, as Zukerman and Karr edgily and enthusiastically alternated virtuoso solos in Giovanni Bottesini's Fantasy on themes from "La Sonnambula." Adrenaline flowed, and not only on the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
There was a nice mingling of art and education, a sort of academic musical bonhomie, in the recital offered Tuesday by flutist Eugenia Zukerman and keyboardist Anthony Newman. Enhancing and complementing that feeling was the site: Keck Theater at Occidental College, a paradoxical paragon of spacious intimacy and comfortable elegance. Completed last summer, the $9 million Keck Theater is the new home of the Oxy theater department and--so far, at least--only infrequently a concert hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With scores faxed to her less than 24 hours before the concert, flutist Eugenia Zukerman stepped in to replace ailing superstar James Galway on Tuesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Zukerman, who had never collaborated with the Tokyo String Quartet, with whom Galway was supposed to start a national tour in Costa Mesa, managed to get only 90 minutes to rehearse two Mozart pieces on the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove Sept. 25, 8 p.m. at the Celebrity Theatre, 201 E. Broadway, Anaheim: Philippe Bender, conductor; Eugenia Zukerman, flute: Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 2; Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique"; Debussy's "Prelude a l'Apres-midi d'un Faune." Nov. 14, 8 p.m. at the Don Wash Auditorium, 11271 Stanford Ave.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Musically engaging, fleet of finger and altogether virtuosic, flutist Eugenia Zukerman returned to Southern California on Tuesday night with a distinguished keyboard partner, Anthony Newman. The two gave a generous program on the eclectic concert/lecture series Spectrum, sponsored by the student body at USC. The location was the acoustically lively University Church on the downtown campus.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | Martin Bernheimer
Summertime, and the listenin' is easy. Easy, of course, is a sometime thing. Take the lavish new production of Gershwin's epochal "Porgy and Bess," which originated in Houston and plays both at the Music Center Opera (June 6-18) and the Orange County Performing Arts Center (June 21-25). The production values are reasonably strong and so are the casts, though the evil intrusion of microphones forces the serious listener to take certain musical qualities on faith.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1998
MOVIES In "The Big Hit," Mark Wahlberg (right, with China Chow) plays a hired killer in a misfired kidnap plot who's made vulnerable by his need to be liked by everybody. This latest U.S. production by Hong Kong action master John Woo opens Friday in general release. Lou Diamond Phillips co-stars. MOVIES Gwyneth Paltrow's destiny is determined by whether or not she makes it aboard an about-to-depart London subway train in "Sliding Doors." Writer-director Peter Howitt tells it both ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With scores faxed to her less than 24 hours before the concert, flutist Eugenia Zukerman stepped in to replace ailing superstar James Galway on Tuesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Zukerman, who had never collaborated with the Tokyo String Quartet, with whom Galway was supposed to start a national tour in Costa Mesa, managed to get only 90 minutes to rehearse two Mozart pieces on the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
There was a nice mingling of art and education, a sort of academic musical bonhomie, in the recital offered Tuesday by flutist Eugenia Zukerman and keyboardist Anthony Newman. Enhancing and complementing that feeling was the site: Keck Theater at Occidental College, a paradoxical paragon of spacious intimacy and comfortable elegance. Completed last summer, the $9 million Keck Theater is the new home of the Oxy theater department and--so far, at least--only infrequently a concert hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1996 | Lynne Heffley, Lynne Heffley is a Times staff writer
The timeless, cross-generational appeal of James M. Barrie's "Peter Pan," with its poignant theme of lost childhood, has been proved in many incarnations, from the 1904 stage play and the 1950 Jean Arthur production to the most-performed 1954 Mary Martin version and the animated Disney film. Composer-conductor Donald Fraser, creator of the clever albums "Heigh-Ho!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listening to the Orange County Symphony play Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique" is a little like watching your 11-year-old attempt a double axel. You're real happy if the effort doesn't end in catastrophe, but you know that the kid is not a contender. Of course, the orchestra, led by Philippe Bender in a program Friday that also included works of Debussy and Mozart, did have to contend with the inhospitable acoustics of the Celebrity Theatre.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|