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Eugenics

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998
Retired warehouse worker Eugene L. Hernandez, a nearly 40-year Ventura County resident, died Saturday. He was 78. Hernandez was born June 5, 1919, in Bakersfield. He served in the U.S. Army and was stationed in Hawaii during the attack on Pearl Harbor, his family said. Hernandez married his wife, Dorothy, in 1938. They met through friends in Bakersfield.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998
Eugene Rutherford of Ventura died Tuesday in a Moorpark long-term care facility after a lengthy illness. He was 72. Rutherford was born Feb. 8, 1926, in Siloam Springs, Ark. He moved from Arkansas to Ventura in 1940. Rutherford worked at Point Mugu Naval Air Station for 46 years and retired in 1985 as the superintendent of the base's refrigeration and air-conditioning department. Rutherford served in the Army for two years and also did a tour with the Merchant Marines.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eugene Ionesco, the Romanian-born playwright who was considered the godfather of the theater of the absurd and wrote the genre's best-known work, "The Rhinoceros," died Monday. He was 81. Ionesco, who had recently suffered from bronchitis, died in his Paris home during a post-lunch nap, his wife, Rodika, said. For many years, he had had arthrosis, a disease of joint deterioration.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eugene Vale, a versatile author, playwright and screenwriter best known for his first novel, "The 13th Apostle," has died. He was 81. Vale, whose 1959 book was a bestseller for more than 30 weeks, died Friday in his Los Angeles home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998
Ventura resident Eugene B. Starzl died Tuesday at his home after a long illness. He was 51. Starzl was born Dec. 2, 1946, in Pasadena. Starzl's family moved to Ventura County in 1949. Starzl attended El Rio Elementary School and was a 1964 graduate of Oxnard High School. Starzl worked as a foreman at a Ventura County lemon company for several years. He enjoyed surfing, motorcycle riding and photography. He also had a private pilot's license.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1986 | From the Associated Press
Eugene Leone, former owner and operator of the famed Mamma Leone's restaurant founded by his mother in New York's theater district, has died after a long illness. He was 88. Leone's daughter, Luisa Leone Mesereau, said in New York that her father died Saturday in Los Angeles. She said he had suffered a stroke, the last in a series dating back six years. Leone was born in Italy in 1898 and came to the United States shortly afterward.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Although Eugene Istomin counts this year as the 45th anniversary of his pianistic debut (with the New York Philharmonic), he looked much as ever at his recital in Ambassador Auditorium on Thursday night. At 60--he turns 61 on Wednesday--he is no graybeard and he is no slouch. He is still a non-threatening type of pianist. He does not strive to overpower or overwhelm. He does not go in for sensational effects, nor attempt to personalize each and every phrase.
NEWS
July 29, 1986
Eugene Fejnas, a former panhandler who for 15 years slept in Elysian Park within sight of Dodger Stadium, and who three weeks ago realized a longtime dream of meeting Dodger Manager Tommy Lasorda, died Thursday of stomach cancer. He was 64. Fejnas was the subject of a recent View profile after friends took him to the Dodger game and arranged for him to meet Lasorda. To many, Fejnas was "Eugene the Puzzle Man," a sobriquet drawn from his passion for jigsaw puzzles.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
In "How the Prize Changed Their Lives" (by Jeff Gottlieb, Dec. 2), Ernest Hemingway's famous words are quoted: "No son of a bitch that ever won the Nobel Prize ever wrote anything worth reading afterward." The most notable exception to Hemingway's rule, however, is Eugene O'Neill. No fewer than five of O'Neill's greatest plays--"The Iceman Cometh," "A Moon for the Misbegotten," "Hughie," "A Touch of the Poet" and his masterpiece, "Long Day's Journey Into Night"--were written after he had won the Nobel Prize.
OPINION
July 12, 2003
Re "Excavate the Past to Make Amends for an Old Sin," Opinion, July 6: Tony Platt's essay on eugenics and sterilization in the past was very much to the point. And unfortunately, it's not dead. Platt failed to mention that Margaret Sanger was one of the leading advocates of eugenics and sterilization in her day. While it is not fair to describe today's Planned Parenthood as primarily motivated by these considerations, nor to attribute these motives to most "pro-choice" people, the popularity of Planned Parenthood among business and corporate donors that support no other "liberal" or "leftist" cause makes you wonder what their motives are. And if you follow biotechnology, the development of "designer genes" and so on, it is clear that we are headed for a bioethical "eugenics" crisis that's different from the one we faced in the 1930s but just as radical.
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