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Eugenics

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1986 | From the Associated Press
Eugene Leone, former owner and operator of the famed Mamma Leone's restaurant founded by his mother in New York's theater district, has died after a long illness. He was 88. Leone's daughter, Luisa Leone Mesereau, said in New York that her father died Saturday in Los Angeles. She said he had suffered a stroke, the last in a series dating back six years. Leone was born in Italy in 1898 and came to the United States shortly afterward.
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MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
In "How the Prize Changed Their Lives" (by Jeff Gottlieb, Dec. 2), Ernest Hemingway's famous words are quoted: "No son of a bitch that ever won the Nobel Prize ever wrote anything worth reading afterward." The most notable exception to Hemingway's rule, however, is Eugene O'Neill. No fewer than five of O'Neill's greatest plays--"The Iceman Cometh," "A Moon for the Misbegotten," "Hughie," "A Touch of the Poet" and his masterpiece, "Long Day's Journey Into Night"--were written after he had won the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
July 29, 1986
Eugene Fejnas, a former panhandler who for 15 years slept in Elysian Park within sight of Dodger Stadium, and who three weeks ago realized a longtime dream of meeting Dodger Manager Tommy Lasorda, died Thursday of stomach cancer. He was 64. Fejnas was the subject of a recent View profile after friends took him to the Dodger game and arranged for him to meet Lasorda. To many, Fejnas was "Eugene the Puzzle Man," a sobriquet drawn from his passion for jigsaw puzzles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Although Eugene Istomin counts this year as the 45th anniversary of his pianistic debut (with the New York Philharmonic), he looked much as ever at his recital in Ambassador Auditorium on Thursday night. At 60--he turns 61 on Wednesday--he is no graybeard and he is no slouch. He is still a non-threatening type of pianist. He does not strive to overpower or overwhelm. He does not go in for sensational effects, nor attempt to personalize each and every phrase.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eugene Trefethen Jr., who oversaw the building of Hoover Dam and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge for Henry J. Kaiser, and later owned a world-class winery estate, has died. He was 86. The philanthropist, who also helped create the Walter A. Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, died Wednesday at his home after a brief illness. Trefethen began his career in 1926, working during school vacations as a sand-and-gravel laborer with the Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2010
ARTHUR BERNARD LEWIS Writer, editor and producer on 'Dallas' Arthur Bernard Lewis, 84, a veteran TV writer who wrote 69 episodes of "Dallas" and also served as executive story editor and supervising producer for the long-running CBS prime-time soap opera, died of complications from pneumonia Oct. 30 at Sherman Oaks Hospital, his family announced. Lewis worked on "Dallas" as a writer and executive story editor beginning in 1978, its first season. He was a supervising producer for 113 episodes, starting in 1981.
OPINION
January 17, 2013 | By Steve Oney
During World War II, as a tank commander in Gen. George S. Patton's 3rd Army, Eugene Patterson participated in a daring maneuver that helped assure the Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge. Asked subsequently what he was most proud of about his part in this and other engagements, Patterson often talked about how he led troops into combat not with an impersonal "Go" but with a command that signaled his intention to expose himself to the same dangers they faced: "Let's go. " Patterson, who died of cancer Saturday at 89, was a 21-year-old lieutenant when he fought under Patton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Eugene Fodor, a swashbuckling violin virtuoso who was a media darling of classical music in the 1970s but whose substance abuse fractured a fairytale career, has died. He was 60. Fodor died of liver disease Feb. 26 at his home in Arlington, Va., said his wife, Susan Davis. He had struggled with addictions to alcohol, cocaine and heroin, she said. At 24, Fodor became the first American to win top honors on violin at the International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1974.
OPINION
July 12, 2003
Re "Excavate the Past to Make Amends for an Old Sin," Opinion, July 6: Tony Platt's essay on eugenics and sterilization in the past was very much to the point. And unfortunately, it's not dead. Platt failed to mention that Margaret Sanger was one of the leading advocates of eugenics and sterilization in her day. While it is not fair to describe today's Planned Parenthood as primarily motivated by these considerations, nor to attribute these motives to most "pro-choice" people, the popularity of Planned Parenthood among business and corporate donors that support no other "liberal" or "leftist" cause makes you wonder what their motives are. And if you follow biotechnology, the development of "designer genes" and so on, it is clear that we are headed for a bioethical "eugenics" crisis that's different from the one we faced in the 1930s but just as radical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2000
Eugene M. Crow, a retired equipment mechanic and lifelong Oxnard resident, died Sunday in an Oxnard hospital after a brief illness. He was 73. He was born Sept. 18, 1926, in Oxnard, where he grew up and went to school. From 1945 to 1947, he served in the Air Force and was stationed in Greenland. Crow worked for Wallace Machinery Co. in Oxnard until 1970. He then opened G & G Auto Electric in Oxnard, which he operated for 15 years.
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