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Eugenics

MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
In "How the Prize Changed Their Lives" (by Jeff Gottlieb, Dec. 2), Ernest Hemingway's famous words are quoted: "No son of a bitch that ever won the Nobel Prize ever wrote anything worth reading afterward." The most notable exception to Hemingway's rule, however, is Eugene O'Neill. No fewer than five of O'Neill's greatest plays--"The Iceman Cometh," "A Moon for the Misbegotten," "Hughie," "A Touch of the Poet" and his masterpiece, "Long Day's Journey Into Night"--were written after he had won the Nobel Prize.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Although Eugene Istomin counts this year as the 45th anniversary of his pianistic debut (with the New York Philharmonic), he looked much as ever at his recital in Ambassador Auditorium on Thursday night. At 60--he turns 61 on Wednesday--he is no graybeard and he is no slouch. He is still a non-threatening type of pianist. He does not strive to overpower or overwhelm. He does not go in for sensational effects, nor attempt to personalize each and every phrase.
NEWS
July 29, 1986
Eugene Fejnas, a former panhandler who for 15 years slept in Elysian Park within sight of Dodger Stadium, and who three weeks ago realized a longtime dream of meeting Dodger Manager Tommy Lasorda, died Thursday of stomach cancer. He was 64. Fejnas was the subject of a recent View profile after friends took him to the Dodger game and arranged for him to meet Lasorda. To many, Fejnas was "Eugene the Puzzle Man," a sobriquet drawn from his passion for jigsaw puzzles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Eugene Fodor, a swashbuckling violin virtuoso who was a media darling of classical music in the 1970s but whose substance abuse fractured a fairytale career, has died. He was 60. Fodor died of liver disease Feb. 26 at his home in Arlington, Va., said his wife, Susan Davis. He had struggled with addictions to alcohol, cocaine and heroin, she said. At 24, Fodor became the first American to win top honors on violin at the International Tchaikovsky Competition in 1974.
OPINION
July 12, 2003
Re "Excavate the Past to Make Amends for an Old Sin," Opinion, July 6: Tony Platt's essay on eugenics and sterilization in the past was very much to the point. And unfortunately, it's not dead. Platt failed to mention that Margaret Sanger was one of the leading advocates of eugenics and sterilization in her day. While it is not fair to describe today's Planned Parenthood as primarily motivated by these considerations, nor to attribute these motives to most "pro-choice" people, the popularity of Planned Parenthood among business and corporate donors that support no other "liberal" or "leftist" cause makes you wonder what their motives are. And if you follow biotechnology, the development of "designer genes" and so on, it is clear that we are headed for a bioethical "eugenics" crisis that's different from the one we faced in the 1930s but just as radical.
NEWS
March 13, 1985 | DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writer
Eugene Ormandy, whose name has been virtually interchangeable with the Philadelphia Orchestra for nearly half a century, died Tuesday. The maestro who lived with his orchestra as with a lifelong love and who viewed its players as his "musical children," was 85 when he died of pneumonia in his Philadelphia home with his wife at his side. Ormandy officially handed over the Philadelphia baton to a younger man, Riccardo Muti, in 1980, but continued as conductor laureate until his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of June 24 - 30 in PDF format TV listings for the week of June 24 - 30 in PDF format are also available here This week's TV Movies   CBS This Morning Maria Sharapova; Kenneth Feinberg; Eugene Levy . (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Andrew Garfield ; U.S. Olympic swim trials; the U.S. women's Olympic soccer team. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning News (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America (N)
NEWS
December 23, 1994
Eugene Zukor, 97, former producer and treasurer for Paramount studios. The only son of Paramount founder Adolph Zukor, he was born in Chicago but moved to New York and then to Los Angeles as his father got into the new business of motion pictures. In the 1930s, the younger Zukor produced films including "The Island of Lost Men," "The Way of All Flesh" and "Women Without Names." He also served in various administrative positions at the studio including treasurer and talent executive.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
Dr. Eugene Ziskind, 93, USC psychiatry professor who chaired the psychiatric departments of County-USC Medical Center and Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. He wrote the textbook "Psychophysiologic Medicine" and more than 140 articles about his research on physical and biological causes of mental illness. Internationally recognized for his work, he was named an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in London in 1974, and was honored by the California State Medical Assn.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2005 | Art Pine, Special to The Times
Former Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy (D-Minn.), whose surprisingly strong showing in the 1968 New Hampshire presidential primary dramatized deepening public opposition to the Vietnam War and effectively ended President Lyndon B. Johnson's political career, died Saturday. He was 89. McCarthy died at a retirement home in the Georgetown section of Washington, where he had lived for several years.
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