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Eugenio Ruiz Orozco

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NEWS
February 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's ruling party suffered one of the most crushing defeats of its 66 years in power as official election returns Monday showed the conservative National Action Party headed for a major opposition sweep in the strategic state of Jalisco. With more than half of the official vote tallied, the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, was losing control of the state for the first time since 1929.
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NEWS
February 14, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's ruling party suffered one of the most crushing defeats of its 66 years in power as official election returns Monday showed the conservative National Action Party headed for a major opposition sweep in the strategic state of Jalisco. With more than half of the official vote tallied, the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, was losing control of the state for the first time since 1929.
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NEWS
February 12, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a closing campaign act for elections today that will test Mexico's President Ernesto Zedillo and his ruling party as never before, Eugenio Ruiz Orozco's final rally in the capital of the state of Jalisco had it all. In the state where mariachi music was born, the would-be ruling-party governor had hired the nation's top two bands. A modern fleet of buses packed Guadalajara's Plaza Juarez with thousands of rural peasants. Trucks brought banners, chairs and a sound system to cover an acre.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a closing campaign act for elections today that will test Mexico's President Ernesto Zedillo and his ruling party as never before, Eugenio Ruiz Orozco's final rally in the capital of the state of Jalisco had it all. In the state where mariachi music was born, the would-be ruling-party governor had hired the nation's top two bands. A modern fleet of buses packed Guadalajara's Plaza Juarez with thousands of rural peasants. Trucks brought banners, chairs and a sound system to cover an acre.
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