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Eureca Laboratory

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August 3, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. astronauts completed delivery of the European Space Agency's EURECA laboratory 230 miles above the Earth on Sunday, but the new satellite failed to reach a higher orbit where it is supposed to operate for several months. European Space Agency officials expressed confidence that a maneuver could be carried out as early as this morning to boost the vehicle into its planned orbit at an altitude of about 330 miles.
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NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
The astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis packed up Friday after a vexing week in space in which they failed to accomplish their main goal: reeling out a satellite on 12 1/2 miles of tether. "Unfortunately in the space exploration business, we have to put all our eggs in one basket sometimes and try to do it all," shuttle pilot Andrew Allen said in a space-to-ground news conference.
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NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
The astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis packed up Friday after a vexing week in space in which they failed to accomplish their main goal: reeling out a satellite on 12 1/2 miles of tether. "Unfortunately in the space exploration business, we have to put all our eggs in one basket sometimes and try to do it all," shuttle pilot Andrew Allen said in a space-to-ground news conference.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. astronauts completed delivery of the European Space Agency's EURECA laboratory 230 miles above the Earth on Sunday, but the new satellite failed to reach a higher orbit where it is supposed to operate for several months. European Space Agency officials expressed confidence that a maneuver could be carried out as early as this morning to boost the vehicle into its planned orbit at an altitude of about 330 miles.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their troubled mission being called a technical success, the Atlantis astronauts Thursday dropped their space shuttle into an orbit just 124 miles high to sample the Earth's ionosphere. Once at the new altitude--lower by 40 miles--the spacecraft pirouetted to fly with its open cargo bay facing forward, allowing an array of instruments to collect free atoms of oxygen for studies of their effects on a variety of materials.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poised for its 12th launching since joining the U.S. space fleet, the shuttle Atlantis is to set out Friday on perhaps the most complex mission flown since the United States began orbiting its aerospace planes more than a decade ago. The planned seven-day odyssey foresees none of the spacewalking heroics that marked the satellite retrieval by astronauts on the shuttle Endeavour in May, but lead flight controller Charles W.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an auspicious beginning to its 12th space voyage, the shuttle Atlantis hurtled into orbit Friday on a mission touted as a bold peek into the future of manned space flight. Stowed in its cargo bay was a 4.5-ton European laboratory, plus a satellite belonging to the space agency of Italy. Joining five U.S. astronauts aboard the orbiter were a payload specialist from Switzerland and a physicist from Italy. The vehicle lifted from its launch pad at 6:56 a.m.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been a quarter of a century since American astronauts tried flying space vehicles linked together by a tether--an experience they found as promising as it was trying. Then, with their Gemini XI spacecraft tied to an Agena rocket with a 100-foot strap, astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and Richard F. Gordon Jr. traveled through space for three hours. The conclusion was that vehicles roped together in space could be successfully maneuvered.
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