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August 28, 2011
'The Trojan Women (After Euripides)' Where: Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades When: 8 p.m. Thursdays to Saturdays, Sept. 8 to Oct. 1. Previews Sept. 1 to 3 Admission: $38 to $42 Info: (310) 440-7300 or http://www.getty.edu
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Just a few years after writing his antiwar masterpiece, "The Trojan Women," Euripides was even more despondent about the reckless imperialist course of Athenian foreign policy. His response wasn't a louder shriek of lament but a rollicking romantic melodrama - escapist fare, really, but with a radical Euripidean twist. Conceived of during a low point in the long and costly Peloponnesian War, "Helen," a sentimental adventure tale with a biting undercurrent of social criticism, dares to debunk the rationale for the Trojan War by imagining an alternative narrative about the faithless beauty who infamously launched a thousand Greek ships.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
"GRIEF Lessons," the Canadian poet and classicist Anne Carson's new rendering of four plays by Euripides, reminds us that the difference between competent and inspired translation is more than a matter of even bravura technical competence. It involves a kind of discreet union between writer and translator, a certain convergence of aesthetic impulse and intellectual inclination.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
“To mortal man, how great a scourge is love,” is one of countless ingenious lines that adorn “The Children” at the Theatre @ Boston Court. Michael Elyanow's stunning riff on the Medea myth rips Euripides into current-day context, and rams its meanings into our brainpans. Beginning before a Stygian drape that masks designer François-Pierre Couture's jagged-wood set, an aptly named Man-In-Slacks and Woman-In-Sundress (Sonny Valicenti and Paige Lindsey White, both beyond praise)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Now is the summer of our discontent. If you'd like a little theatrical relief from all that's ailing America's body politic, Anne Bogart and SITI Company are probably not your ticket. FOR THE RECORD: Tragedian's name: The subheadline in an earlier version of this online article misspelled the name of ancient Greek tragedian Euripides as Euripedes. Their new adaptation of Euripides' "The Trojan Women," which begins previews Thursday at the Getty Villa's outdoor amphitheater, aims to rekindle the original political intent of a play that drives home an unrelentingly dark vision of what war does to victims and victors alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011
STAGE In Greek mythology, the half-man, half-beast creatures known as satyrs were the raucous companions of Dionysus, the god of wine and theater. "Satyr Atlas," the latest work in progress from the experimental-theater troupe Poor Dog Group, will befit the legend with a lively performance inspired by ancient drama, imagery and lore and based on text by Euripides. The play features nudity and lewd theatrics and is recommended for adult audiences. Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, L.A. 8 p.m. Fri., 3 and 8 p.m. Sat. $7. (310)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Just a few years after writing his antiwar masterpiece, "The Trojan Women," Euripides was even more despondent about the reckless imperialist course of Athenian foreign policy. His response wasn't a louder shriek of lament but a rollicking romantic melodrama - escapist fare, really, but with a radical Euripidean twist. Conceived of during a low point in the long and costly Peloponnesian War, "Helen," a sentimental adventure tale with a biting undercurrent of social criticism, dares to debunk the rationale for the Trojan War by imagining an alternative narrative about the faithless beauty who infamously launched a thousand Greek ships.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2002 | Charles McNulty, Special to The Times
For an actress with dreams of a Tony award, a tragedy from 431 BC might just provide the winning role she's been looking for. "Medea," Euripides' proto-feminist potboiler about a woman who murders her children to exact revenge on her faithless husband, has landed theater's top acting honor for three actresses: Judith Anderson (1948), Zoe Caldwell (1982) and Diana Rigg (1994). And if early indications hold true, a fourth name may soon be added.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
“To mortal man, how great a scourge is love,” is one of countless ingenious lines that adorn “The Children” at the Theatre @ Boston Court. Michael Elyanow's stunning riff on the Medea myth rips Euripides into current-day context, and rams its meanings into our brainpans. Beginning before a Stygian drape that masks designer François-Pierre Couture's jagged-wood set, an aptly named Man-In-Slacks and Woman-In-Sundress (Sonny Valicenti and Paige Lindsey White, both beyond praise)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1986 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Some of us may recall Medea as that madwoman of Corinth. Some of us may know next to nothing about Euripides' psychological tragedy of a passionate woman's love revenged. Those in either camp who see Reza Abdoh's radicalized, ritualistic version at the Hollywood Recreation Center will know they haven't seen anything quite like this before. A few might wonder where it came from. Imps and purists will say Mars, but they would be missing the essential ingredient here.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Now is the summer of our discontent. If you'd like a little theatrical relief from all that's ailing America's body politic, Anne Bogart and SITI Company are probably not your ticket. FOR THE RECORD: Tragedian's name: The subheadline in an earlier version of this online article misspelled the name of ancient Greek tragedian Euripides as Euripedes. Their new adaptation of Euripides' "The Trojan Women," which begins previews Thursday at the Getty Villa's outdoor amphitheater, aims to rekindle the original political intent of a play that drives home an unrelentingly dark vision of what war does to victims and victors alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011
'The Trojan Women (After Euripides)' Where: Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades When: 8 p.m. Thursdays to Saturdays, Sept. 8 to Oct. 1. Previews Sept. 1 to 3 Admission: $38 to $42 Info: (310) 440-7300 or http://www.getty.edu
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011
STAGE In Greek mythology, the half-man, half-beast creatures known as satyrs were the raucous companions of Dionysus, the god of wine and theater. "Satyr Atlas," the latest work in progress from the experimental-theater troupe Poor Dog Group, will befit the legend with a lively performance inspired by ancient drama, imagery and lore and based on text by Euripides. The play features nudity and lewd theatrics and is recommended for adult audiences. Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, L.A. 8 p.m. Fri., 3 and 8 p.m. Sat. $7. (310)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In 2003, documentary filmmaker Jessica Yu was approached about making a film about the life of the ancient Greek dramatist Euripides.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
"GRIEF Lessons," the Canadian poet and classicist Anne Carson's new rendering of four plays by Euripides, reminds us that the difference between competent and inspired translation is more than a matter of even bravura technical competence. It involves a kind of discreet union between writer and translator, a certain convergence of aesthetic impulse and intellectual inclination.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
THE great-great-grandparents of drama -- the ancient Greek and Roman playwrights -- have a permanent new home at the Getty Villa museum near Malibu, where they will live off the largesse of the multibillion-dollar J. Paul Getty Trust and see how much noise, figuratively speaking, they can still make after two millennia or more.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992
The correct translation of the original Euripides quote ("What Is That Quote?," Feb. 1) is: "Whom the Gods wish to destroy, they first make successful in show business." FRANCIS COPPOLA Rutherford
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Mark Swed
Though nominally based in Los Angeles, Peter Sellars rarely manages to get his work seen locally these days. Los Angeles Opera considered the gripping production of Mozart's "Idomeneo" he did at England's Glyndebourne festival for next season's opener, but the company was discouraged by its Wagnerian length. Unlike most productions of the opera, Sellars' includes the half-hour concluding ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Euripides fans -- and we know you are legion -- rejoice. Two worthy productions of "Medea" are running within easy traveling distance of Los Angeles. Directorially speaking, the interpretations are radically different, but both feature superlative casts, cogent translations and the kind of emotional truthfulness guaranteed to give a genuine cathartic charge. David Bridel takes the more classical approach in his staging at Cal Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Mark Swed
Though nominally based in Los Angeles, Peter Sellars rarely manages to get his work seen locally these days. Los Angeles Opera considered the gripping production of Mozart's "Idomeneo" he did at England's Glyndebourne festival for next season's opener, but the company was discouraged by its Wagnerian length. Unlike most productions of the opera, Sellars' includes the half-hour concluding ballet.
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