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Eurocorps

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NEWS
May 26, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With initial help from the United States, the nations of Western Europe emerged from the ashes of World War II, blossoming into stable democracies and a major global economic force. Today, the region's economy is one-third larger than that of the United States, and the majority of its citizens enjoy a level of personal well-being in the form of medical, educational and social benefits that far exceeds that of Americans.
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NEWS
May 26, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With initial help from the United States, the nations of Western Europe emerged from the ashes of World War II, blossoming into stable democracies and a major global economic force. Today, the region's economy is one-third larger than that of the United States, and the majority of its citizens enjoy a level of personal well-being in the form of medical, educational and social benefits that far exceeds that of Americans.
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NEWS
May 23, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
France and Germany took an important step toward the creation of a Western European army Friday, announcing the establishment of a headquarters in Strasbourg, France, by July and calling on other European countries to enlist their forces.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German soldiers paraded down the famed Champs Elysees on Thursday, the 205th anniversary of the French Revolution, riding armored vehicles through the city for the first time since 1944 in a grand though controversial gesture of French and German reconciliation. The 200 German troops, part of a new, five-nation Eurocorps commanded by German Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1994 | JONATHAN CLARKE, Jonathan Clarke, a member of the British diplomatic service for 20 years, is now at the Cato Institute in Washington. and
In determining their November vote, most Americans probably paid little regard to foreign military policy, except perhaps to feel that the Republicans would display a surer grasp of American interests than would the Clinton Administration. It is still early, but the warning signs are already flashing: The initial pronouncements of senior Republicans on such subjects as Bosnia, NATO and North Korea contain all too much political posturing unrelated to real events on the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995 | WILLIAM PFAFF, William Pfaff is a Times syndicated columnist based in Paris.
France's nuclear test in the Pacific has blown up in the face of President Jacques Chirac and his government, but this is unlikely to cause more than a shortening of the eight-test series. The scale of the global reaction, and particularly its violent synthesis with the independence movement in Tahiti, was clearly unexpected. But Chirac is a man of his own mind; when he was younger, he was called "the Bulldozer."
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization agreed Thursday to authorize use of its military forces for peacekeeping missions outside NATO's borders in strife-torn areas such as Yugoslavia. It was the first time that NATO has formally decided that its troops and equipment may be deployed outside the frontiers that the alliance was created to defend against any threat from the Soviet Union during the Cold War.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bosnia's warring factions stagger toward an uncertain peace, NATO planners have begun to put together a force of about 50,000 to enforce an eventual settlement in the region. The alliance-led force would replace the beleaguered United Nations peacekeepers now deployed in Bosnia-Herzegovina and would put as many as 25,000 U.S. soldiers on the ground in the Balkans.
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