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December 19, 1990 | JOEL HAVEMANN and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The European Community's foreign ministers Tuesday called off a scheduled meeting with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz, even though U.S. officials had switched signals and said the meeting would be all right with them. The foreign ministers decided that European nations should not negotiate separately with Iraq until Baghdad and Washington first hold their own talks. To do otherwise, they felt, would risk sending the wrong signal to Baghdad.
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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | United Press International
The European Community and Moscow ended months of haggling Thursday and agreed to begin the delivery of $258 million in emergency food aid to Soviet schools, hospitals and other institutions by early July. But EC and Soviet officials said they have not concluded an accord on the $840 million in technical help promised by EC heads of state at their December, 1990 summit in Rome.
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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | United Press International
The European Community and Moscow ended months of haggling Thursday and agreed to begin the delivery of $258 million in emergency food aid to Soviet schools, hospitals and other institutions by early July. But EC and Soviet officials said they have not concluded an accord on the $840 million in technical help promised by EC heads of state at their December, 1990 summit in Rome.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | JOEL HAVEMANN and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The European Community's foreign ministers Tuesday called off a scheduled meeting with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz, even though U.S. officials had switched signals and said the meeting would be all right with them. The foreign ministers decided that European nations should not negotiate separately with Iraq until Baghdad and Washington first hold their own talks. To do otherwise, they felt, would risk sending the wrong signal to Baghdad.
NEWS
September 9, 1986
Leaders of Western Europe's Jewish communities will meet in Paris on Thursday to discuss measures to increase security for synagogues and Jewish institutions in the aftermath of Saturday's attack in Istanbul, Turkey. The meeting will be chaired by Edgar M. Bronfman, president of the World Jewish Congress, which represents communities in 70 countries.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | GLENN FRANKEL, THE WASHINGTON POST
Michael Williams lived with his wife, Mavis, and eight of their 12 children in a cramped but tidy rowhouse in Bogside, this city's Catholic ghetto. One afternoon, as he was putting out the milk bottles, he heard a woman's hysterical screams next door and did what any good neighbor would--he bounded to the nearest telephone and dialed the police. But Bogside is no ordinary community, and the two young gunmen inside his neighbor's home were no ordinary hoodlums.
REAL ESTATE
July 20, 1986 | SAM HALL KAPLAN
The only terrorist I observed in Europe during a two-month sojourn there were drivers; the only acts of terrorism--traffic. And the traffic, brought on by increasing car ownership, threatens to hold hostage the architecture and ambiance of Europe's historic communities and city centers. The sorry situation exists despite most cities having accessible and, generally, efficient mass transit systems, serving in particular center city areas.
NEWS
January 16, 2005 | Scheherezade Faramarzi, Associated Press Writer
Mohammed Alami, 20, sells reggae CDs and believes every Muslim has a duty to go fight in Iraq to drive out the Americans. But he isn't prepared to go himself. "Maybe I'm afraid I'm going to die and not solve anything, have an impact," Alami, a Briton of Moroccan origin, said as he stood at his stall in an open market in central London. The fall of Saddam Hussein in March 2003 and the U.S.
WORLD
September 4, 2005 | Hossam Hamalawy, Times Staff Writer
Each time he trims his beard, Egyptian cleric Hani Sebai says, he remembers how interrogators burned it after he was picked up by security services in Cairo nearly a quarter of a century ago. After several rounds of detentions, he fled the country with his family. "I knew from the beginning that London was going to be my destination," he said. "I knew the British were famous for defending human rights. We had a very rosy picture of London as a city where the oppressed could find protection."
WORLD
May 22, 2006 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Along with banks and chocolates, this placid lakefront city has another claim to fame: It is full of spies. Claude Covassi, a broad-shouldered, gray-eyed martial arts expert, was one of them. He became an informant for Swiss intelligence in early 2004, converted to Islam and infiltrated fundamentalist circles here in his hometown. He followed the trail of holy warriors all the way to mosques in Syria where aspiring foreign "martyrs" are groomed for Iraq.
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