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NEWS
November 30, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense ministers of the Western Alliance on Wednesday reaffirmed the need for a strong defense. They acted at the close of a two-day meeting that concerned itself mainly with the rapid changes taking place in Eastern Europe and reports of a projected reduction in U.S. troops in Western Europe.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 2004 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Grumman Corp. is teaming up with Europe's largest defense contractor to compete for a $2-billion Pentagon contract to build the Air Force's next-generation search-and-rescue helicopter. It marks the latest move by European firms to penetrate the lucrative U.S. defense market. For decades, the Pentagon has been reluctant to give foreign companies much more than token contracts for parts and supplies, but European firms now are hoping for a bigger share of the pie.
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NEWS
January 31, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a move that Western analysts here said has more political than practical importance, the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact nations published Monday for the first time detailed data on their military forces in Europe and their estimates of NATO forces. East Bloc defense ministers said in an accompanying statement that the data shows "rough parity" between the two sides.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia have made "good progress" toward qualifying for NATO membership, U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Saturday. In a meeting with his counterparts from the Nordic and Baltic nations, Rumsfeld said the United States favors adding members to the alliance when they are ready. At a news conference afterward, Rumsfeld did not define "ready" or say whether the Baltic countries would be invited to join.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the powerful House Armed Services Committee, said Tuesday that it is vital to follow up an expected U.S.-Soviet arms agreement by improving the balance of conventional forces in Europe and restoring the ceiling on long-range strategic nuclear weapons. Addressing an arms control meeting of the American Assn.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking further savings from the declining Soviet threat, Democratic House and Senate leaders said Sunday that U.S. troop levels in Central Europe should be cut to about 100,000 within a few years, or roughly half the level proposed last week by President Bush. But the suggestion by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) drew immediate fire from President Bush's chief of staff, John H.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Delegates from 35 nations, meeting Sunday in Vienna, formally adopted an ambitious array of arms control and human rights proposals hailed as a new landmark in relations between East and West. Winding up nearly 27 months of European security talks, the delegates put their seals on a document that pledges greater human rights safeguards and better East-West trade and commits NATO and the Warsaw Pact to negotiations aimed at sharp cutbacks in conventional weapons in Europe.
NEWS
December 15, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan acknowledged Monday that there are concerns in Western Europe that the new U.S.-Soviet arms control treaty will be damaging to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, but he said such fears will prove to be groundless.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, showing a new-found confidence, affirmed Friday that it will continue to play the leading role in the defense of the West. In the aftermath of the Cold War and the changing political face of Europe, NATO has been casting about for a new role amid uncertainties about its future among some of its 16 member nations.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Munich and Brussels to Washington, diplomats and politicians are grappling with a nagging question: Now that the Cold War is over, is the long U.S. friendship with Western Europe heading off the track into a future of increasing conflict? Two long-running U.S.-European arguments--one over a worldwide trade pact, the other over the U.S. role in Europe's defense--suddenly combined in recent weeks to create an unexpected case of transatlantic jitters.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Reuters
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld praised U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo on Tuesday for helping secure peace there and made no mention of sentiment in Washington for reducing overseas troop deployments. On the first visit to Kosovo by a senior figure in the Bush administration, he spoke to a gathering of several hundred cheering army soldiers in a tent at the main U.S. base in the Yugoslav province, saying their job was "truly a noble calling."
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A diplomatic charm offensive by the Bush administration aimed at persuading skeptical NATO allies that they need a space-based missile shield has sold Europeans on the style of the U.S. pitch but not the substance of the project. The high-level delegation that swept across the continent this week also made headway in convincing security partners that a new concept of strategic deterrence is needed to ward off threats from strange new menaces labeled "nations of concern."
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Vladimir V. Putin presented a plan for a European missile defense program to NATO Secretary-General George Robertson on Tuesday, warning that chances of a renewed Cold War and a new arms race are growing. Putin told the visiting Robertson that despite the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's rhetoric, the alliance's actions seem to treat Russia as an enemy. And under those circumstances, Russia must take steps to defend itself.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Italian army Capt. Roberto Punzo, a helicopter pilot, is the very model of the new European soldier. He speaks fluent English. He serves under a French general and eats in a French mess. He took part in a four-nation effort to build a European military helicopter.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Europe, which shares everything these days from a currency to regulations on hunting migratory birds, is embarking this week toward the creation of a unified military force, a prospect that has given Washington the jitters. At a summit of the 15 European Union member states Friday and Saturday in Helsinki, Finland, EU leaders are expected to vote for the development of a "rapid-reaction corps" of 50,000 to 60,000 troops under direct EU control.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ROBERT SEELY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
German and Spanish aerospace titans plan to merge. Britain's two largest defense concerns have joined forces as the world's third-biggest arms producer. The French government is beginning to privatize its defense businesses. The end of the Cold War a decade ago has left Europe's defense industries fighting for shares of a dwindling arms market and inspired a round of pan-European mergers and talk of transatlantic deals.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
France and Germany proposed a separate European military force Wednesday that would operate outside the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--a move that was quickly questioned by Britain. In a joint announcement in Paris and Bonn, France and Germany said they want a large force--French sources put the corps at 50,000--that could serve as the nucleus for a Europe-only military capability.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization agreed here Thursday on a dramatic reduction in its nuclear armory in Europe. NATO defense ministers decided to eliminate fully 80% of the alliance's 3,500 nuclear weapons--leaving only 700 air-delivered atomic bombs at European air bases. The ministers also approved the outlines of the sweeping new strategy for NATO in the aftermath of the Cold War, based on smaller, more mobile forces able to respond to contingencies inside and outside Europe.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Tony Blair said Friday that he has nominated Defense Secretary George Robertson to be secretary-general of NATO. "George has exactly the right mix of defense expertise and political and diplomatic skills," Blair said in Sarajevo during a Balkans summit. There are no formal candidates, and selection of a replacement for Spaniard Javier Solana is a matter of consensus.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | From Reuters
The European Union decided Thursday to build a common defense structure to deal with future crises such as the war in Yugoslavia. Leaders of the 15 member nations, meeting here at a regular half-yearly summit, approved a plan to create a common foreign and security policy over the next 18 months.
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