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July 3, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Morten Rendum lived in the United States, he would probably be a high school dropout, or, at best, a graduate with no marketable skills and no idea of what he wanted to do next. But he lives in Denmark and, at 21, he is just finishing his schooling. It's not exactly a high school that he attends, and it's certainly not a college.
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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martin McGuinness, education minister in Northern Ireland's power-sharing government, confirmed publicly for the first time Wednesday that he was a senior commander of the Irish Republican Army during some of the bloodiest days of the province's sectarian conflict. McGuinness is a leader of Sinn Fein, the political arm of the IRA, and his early militancy in the armed group has been an open secret since he was twice jailed for it in the 1970s.
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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martin McGuinness, education minister in Northern Ireland's power-sharing government, confirmed publicly for the first time Wednesday that he was a senior commander of the Irish Republican Army during some of the bloodiest days of the province's sectarian conflict. McGuinness is a leader of Sinn Fein, the political arm of the IRA, and his early militancy in the armed group has been an open secret since he was twice jailed for it in the 1970s.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex has once again become a political issue in Great Britain--not senior officials caught in the wrong bedroom, but rather sex education in classrooms. The center of the storm is the Health Education Authority, a semiautonomous organization that among other things oversees the instruction pamphlets used in state schools.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex has once again become a political issue in Great Britain--not senior officials caught in the wrong bedroom, but rather sex education in classrooms. The center of the storm is the Health Education Authority, a semiautonomous organization that among other things oversees the instruction pamphlets used in state schools.
OPINION
January 12, 2005 | Stephen Prothero, Stephen Prothero teaches at Boston University and is author of "American Jesus: How the Son of God Became a National Icon" (Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2003).
The sociologist Peter Berger once remarked that if India is the most religious country in the world and Sweden the least, then the United States is a nation of Indians ruled by Swedes. Not anymore. With a Jesus lover in the Oval Office and a faith-based party in control of both houses of Congress, the United States is undeniably a nation of believers ruled by the same. Things are different in Europe, and not just in Sweden.
HOME & GARDEN
December 4, 2010 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Getting the holiday tree together? Here's how it often works. Mom drives to the storage locker and exhumes cartons of ornaments exported by countries that put Santa's workshop out of business a decade ago. Dad drives a Tahoe to Home Depot, ropes an 8-foot pine to the roof. Back home, they drag the thing into the house, shove it to the front window, load on the glitter, string up the garland and plug in the twinklers that light up the room and the neighborhood. Kaboom. It's Christmas magic again.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When an independent Ukraine starts using its new money this year, the bills will be the handiwork of a Canadian printing concern, Canadian Bank Note Co. Canadian Bank Note will print 1.5 billion bills for Ukraine, enough paper to fill 39 jumbo jets, according to corporate secretary Shirley Arends. She said the company hopes to use the Ukrainian contract as a jumping-off point for negotiating currency-printing deals with the other new countries that were until recently Soviet republics.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008 | Reed Johnson
The Don Bosco Communal Center looks much like any other social services agency building in any hardscrabble barrio anywhere in Latin America. But step inside and you may hear the opening notes of Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 spilling from a second-floor rehearsal room filled with 15- and 16-year-old string players. Or youthful fingers plucking a traditional Venezuelan folk tune on a harp, accompanied by a soft percussive rattle.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Morten Rendum lived in the United States, he would probably be a high school dropout, or, at best, a graduate with no marketable skills and no idea of what he wanted to do next. But he lives in Denmark and, at 21, he is just finishing his schooling. It's not exactly a high school that he attends, and it's certainly not a college.
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