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October 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a celebration of the end of the Cold War, the foreign ministers of 35 European and North American nations pledged Monday to convert the 15-year-old Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) into a stable bridge between East and West. "Fifteen years ago, in a Europe divided East from West, the CSCE offered a vision of a Europe united, whole and free," President Bush said at the start of a two-day foreign ministers meeting.
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NEWS
December 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
The European Union flung open its doors Saturday to former enemies in Eastern Europe but steadfastly blocked the entry of its longtime NATO ally, Turkey. Calling it "a moment of historic significance," the 15 EU leaders ended a two-day summit with invitations to Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Estonia and Cyprus to begin membership negotiations and offered a slower track to Romania, Latvia, Bulgaria, Lithuania and Slovakia.
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NEWS
December 11, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two years after the fall of the Berlin Wall raised hopes of an end to the Continent's long division, Europe is spinning further apart, not coming closer together. Dramatic events over the last two days in Minsk and Maastricht--European cities thousands of miles and worlds apart--have underscored this reality. Indeed, one of the few things these events share is that both present new challenges to the United States.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 12-nation European Union formalized plans Saturday that would open membership to countries of the former Communist East Bloc. Although EU members were criticized for the absence of any precise timetable, adopting the plan constitutes an important step in extending the push for an economically and politically unified Europe beyond the Continent's old Cold War divide for the first time.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
The European Union flung open its doors Saturday to former enemies in Eastern Europe but steadfastly blocked the entry of its longtime NATO ally, Turkey. Calling it "a moment of historic significance," the 15 EU leaders ended a two-day summit with invitations to Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Estonia and Cyprus to begin membership negotiations and offered a slower track to Romania, Latvia, Bulgaria, Lithuania and Slovakia.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Hungarian diplomat Tibor Kiss regarded the fenced-in, low-slung headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization here as a forbidding fortress--definitely off limits to East European officials. But times have changed, and today Kiss, the embassy's No. 2 man, finds himself invited often to NATO to talk to officials there on a wide range of political and security matters.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 12-nation European Union formalized plans Saturday that would open membership to countries of the former Communist East Bloc. Although EU members were criticized for the absence of any precise timetable, adopting the plan constitutes an important step in extending the push for an economically and politically unified Europe beyond the Continent's old Cold War divide for the first time.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Hungarian diplomat Tibor Kiss regarded the fenced-in, low-slung headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization here as a forbidding fortress--definitely off limits to East European officials. But times have changed, and today Kiss, the embassy's No. 2 man, finds himself invited often to NATO to talk to officials there on a wide range of political and security matters.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two years after the fall of the Berlin Wall raised hopes of an end to the Continent's long division, Europe is spinning further apart, not coming closer together. Dramatic events over the last two days in Minsk and Maastricht--European cities thousands of miles and worlds apart--have underscored this reality. Indeed, one of the few things these events share is that both present new challenges to the United States.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a celebration of the end of the Cold War, the foreign ministers of 35 European and North American nations pledged Monday to convert the 15-year-old Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) into a stable bridge between East and West. "Fifteen years ago, in a Europe divided East from West, the CSCE offered a vision of a Europe united, whole and free," President Bush said at the start of a two-day foreign ministers meeting.
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