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NEWS
February 4, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It won't happen in 1992. It won't even happen in the 1990s. But, gradually and painstakingly, the continent whose bloody rivalries bred this century's two cataclysmic world wars is transforming itself into something that might one day resemble a "United States of Europe." Never in the history of humankind have so many nations voluntarily come together to sacrifice so much of their sovereign power.
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WORLD
May 19, 2012 | Henry Chu and Lauren Frayer
The alarm over potential bank runs in Greece and Spain this week has highlighted an often-overlooked fact: Europe's debt crisis is also, in many ways, a major banking crisis. In capitals such as Athens, Madrid and Rome, large portions of the sovereign debt racked up by spendthrift governments are owed to the countries' own banks, locking governments and the banks in an embrace so tight that disaster for one would almost certainly spell doom for the other. International bailouts for Greece, Ireland and Portugal have helped to keep not just their governments but also their banks afloat, as well as financial institutions in other parts of Europe with large exposure to those nations' debts.
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NEWS
June 9, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Suddenly, unexpectedly, the left is back. In France, voters on June 1 stunningly repudiated the ruling center-right government, sweeping a leftist coalition to control of the National Assembly and installing Socialist Party chief Lionel Jospin as the new prime minister. His victory came only weeks after Tony Blair led Britain's Labor Party to its most lopsided triumph ever.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Time to poke your head out of the foxhole. Wall Street ended a painful eight-day losing streak on Wednesday with a modest gain. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 29.82 points, or 0.3%, to 11,896.44, rallying from an early decline of as much as 165 points. All told, the Dow has fallen nearly 830 points, or 6.5%, in less than two weeks. Here are answers to some of the questions dazed investors may have about what has happened. Why did the market hit such a severe losing streak?
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The European Parliament is an easy institution to poke fun at. Despite its name, it has scarcely any legislative powers. It is the European Community's version of a fifth wheel--a sort of fourth branch of a three-branch government. Its role is largely to provide advice that the EC's real decision-making bodies are mostly free to ignore. Yet Parliament has a huge budget--nearly $800 million a year, about half of the U.S. Congress' $1.5 billion.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At last weekend's European Community summit meeting here, the leaders of the 12 member states agreed to seek a singular definition of a contentious concept: political union among their states. But that is easier said than done, for as a diplomat dryly commented, "The trouble with political union is that there are dozens of definitions of what it means."
NEWS
September 17, 1991
From the Atlantic to the Urals, the European continent is undergoing dramatic change. In the West, highly developed economies are merging under the banner of "Europe '92." In the East, struggling new democracies are taking their baby steps. Germany is finding out that political unification does not translate automatically or even easily into economic and social unity. And in what used to be the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, decades of icy immobility have turned into a torrent of upheaval.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The brightly lit circular chamber where the European Parliament meets is in a dramatic, modern building that seems a fitting place for making decisions that shape Europe's future. The flaw in the symbolism is that the building, the Palais de l'Europe, does not belong to the European Parliament. It is rented from the Council of Europe.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev appealed Thursday for East-West cooperation to build "a commonwealth of sovereign democratic states" in Europe based on ethnic and political tolerance, religious freedom and pluralism. Climaxing a triumphant Italian visit with a 38-minute address at the Campidoglio, Rome's historic City Hall, Gorbachev proposed a conference with U.S. and European leaders next year to restructure relationships for what he called "an entirely new era."
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gap has developed between the United States and its European allies about the importance of fast-moving changes in East Europe and how to react to them. Europeans argue that on such vital issues as growing instability in the Soviet Empire, the flowering of democracy in Poland and Hungary, and pressure for closeness between the two Germanys, the U.S. response has been characterized by sometimes contradictory voices.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2010 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
The battered U.S. bond market ended the week with a rally on Friday, as the highest yields since at least spring lured buyers. The benchmark 10-year Treasury note yield fell to 3.32%, off from 3.47% on Thursday and down from a seven-month high of 3.52% on Wednesday. Traders said the Treasury market was helped as some investors sought a haven amid more fallout from Europe's government-debt crisis. Despite the European Union's bailout package for Ireland, which the country accepted this week, Moody's Investors Service on Friday issued a stunning vote of no-confidence in both the EU and Ireland: The firm slashed the island nation's debt rating to Baa1 from Aa2, a cut of five notches.
WORLD
May 25, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Governments in Europe are scrambling to introduce austerity measures that would slash their budget deficits, as investor fears about high public-debt levels continued to hammer the continent's stock markets and currencies. Britain's new coalition government used Tuesday's official state opening of Parliament, a ceremony filled with pomp and pageantry, to reiterate its commitment to getting the country's books in order. "The first priority is to reduce the deficit and restore economic growth," Queen Elizabeth II said in the House of Lords, in accordance with tradition that the monarch outlines the agenda of the ruling government.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2008 | Henry Chu and Christian Retzlaff, Times Staff Writers
Like soldiers falling into step, governments across Europe offered up a series of sweeping bailout plans for their banking systems Monday, pushing past $2 trillion the amount of taxpayer money that has been pledged to shore up the continent's floundering financial sector. Markets responded positively to the news, with stock exchanges gaining back some of the ground lost in last week's selling binge.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
The tsunami of global stock sell-offs swept through Europe on Friday as shareholders deserted the markets in droves, pushing down stock prices in a frenzy some dubbed Red October. Exchanges that had hit record highs just a year ago plunged almost from the moment they opened. London's FTSE 100 lost 10% of its value within half an hour of the opening bell.
NEWS
June 16, 2002 | SELCAN HACAOGLU, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
ANKARA, Turkey -- Olga, a slim 24-year-old Russian blond, never met her Turkish husband. A Russian prostitution ring arranged the marriage through bribery to provide her with instant Turkish citizenship--a shield against deportation if she is ever caught. Prostitution has become more visible in Turkey since the collapse of the Soviet Union led to an influx of tens of thousands of women working for sex gangs.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
European truckers' protests over high fuel prices spread Friday, backing up traffic for miles on highways from Spain to Poland. Some governments caved in while others refused, reflecting the political divisions on the continent. In The Hague, truck and taxi drivers circled government buildings blaring their horns to demand tax breaks--an unusually boisterous protest in the Netherlands, a nation where politics usually proceeds by consensus and quiet negotiation.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | Wm. D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after the end of the Cold War, leaning to the left is once again fashionable among voters in Europe, where socialism was born and cradle-to-grave government welfare programs are everybody's birthright. France has now joined a turn-of-the-century electoral trend shifting the political center of gravity markedly to the left in both Western and Eastern Europe. Socialist parties now rule or share government in 13 of the 15 nations of the European Union.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somebody attending this week's conclave of European leaders in Amsterdam might well have come away asking: Is "European union" on the way to becoming a contradiction in terms like "military intelligence" or "civil war"? At their two-day European Union summit, the 15 member countries managed to agree sufficiently so that their trading bloc can proceed as scheduled with talks to admit new members, including some from Eastern Europe. But the conference often came close to being a fiasco.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Romania's environment minister Saturday threatened to close mining companies that do not respect the government's safety regulations, a day after 20,000 tons of heavy metal escaped from a zinc and lead mine in northwestern Romania.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flaming torches in their hands and outrage in their hearts, the protesters from the far-right Vlaams Blok were on the move. Their government had plans to open a center for foreign asylum-seekers in their city--and weren't there far too many foreigners already? "Enough is enough! Antwerp is not a garbage can!" the march leader, Filip Dewinter, blared through a megaphone as 120 riot police backed by Belgian shepherd dogs blocked demonstrators from going any farther.
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