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NEWS
April 28, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she arrived from Ghana 18 years ago, trained caterer Anna Saakwa was swiftly granted a license in her field. She found work cooking for an old folks' home and learned fluent Danish thanks to the patient tutelage of co-workers and the retirees she was hired to serve. Such was the pleasant experience for most refugees in Denmark until a few years ago, when opponents of immigration gained the upper hand.
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NEWS
February 11, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a century ago, the Caronna family bade farewell to Italy. Estela Caronna and her three children packed into a bus in Acerenza, a hillside town in Potenza province, and traveled by boat to a South American country whose very name was to them synonymous with affluence. None of them ever returned. Today, in an Argentina that every day becomes poorer and more violent, Caronna's granddaughter dreams of that village she's never seen.
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NEWS
May 17, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His new blue suit pressed, his lone suitcase perched hopefully nearby, the man who called himself Kanda Koso patiently awaited his fate. After trying to get through immigration at the sprawling Schiphol Airport with a false Zairian passport, the self-described 26-year-old shoemaker promptly declared that he wanted political asylum. Now he sat in a corner of the empty immigration area as Dutch authorities discussed his fate and tried to determine if he really was from Zaire.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bucking a tide of anti-immigration sentiment in Europe, about 30,000 people, some here illegally from poor countries, called Thursday for freer movement of job seekers across borders. "A global village without borders," demanded one of the hundreds of banners at the event, the first in a series of planned protests against leaders of the world's major industrialized nations who convene here today.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ministers from 27 European governments Thursday agreed on a series of short-term measures to reduce the rising number of illegal immigrants pouring into the Continent's rich Western countries, threatening to cause social and political instability.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Semsa Kasic's only comforts in life are more likely tragedies she hasn't learned of yet. The 66-year-old Muslim who was pushed from her home at gunpoint in the Bosnian village of Sepak lives for the day she can be reunited with her son, who was taken away by Serbian gunmen who looted and burned their home three months ago. She is unaware of the guerrillas' boast that they take no prisoners.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
"Our objective is . . . to do away with internal frontier controls in their entirety." --A 1985 European Community commitment Perched in his second-floor office on the Belgian-West German border, chief customs officer Peter Noben admits that his future is uncertain. The highway control point that he commands here is among the busiest in Europe, but by 1993 it could vanish.
NEWS
July 15, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 58 Chinese immigrants found suffocated in the back of a refrigerated truck in Dover last month have exposed a horrifyingly simple truth: Men, women and children are dying to get into Europe. Although the Dover tragedy was extreme, it was hardly isolated. More than 2,000 people are known to have died crossing the seas and borders of Western Europe in the last seven years, and the mortal tide continues with numbing regularity.
NEWS
October 23, 1990
Foreign affairs head the agenda as the heads of the 12 European Community nations meet in the Italian capital this weekend. It will be the first time the EC leaders have a chance to collectively discuss the Persian Gulf crisis--including the sensitive issue of linkage between a Palestinian settlement and an Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait. Washington adamantly opposes such a linkage, but some Europeans are more sympathetic to the idea.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bucking a tide of anti-immigration sentiment in Europe, about 30,000 people, some here illegally from poor countries, called Thursday for freer movement of job seekers across borders. "A global village without borders," demanded one of the hundreds of banners at the event, the first in a series of planned protests against leaders of the world's major industrialized nations who convene here today.
NEWS
July 15, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 58 Chinese immigrants found suffocated in the back of a refrigerated truck in Dover last month have exposed a horrifyingly simple truth: Men, women and children are dying to get into Europe. Although the Dover tragedy was extreme, it was hardly isolated. More than 2,000 people are known to have died crossing the seas and borders of Western Europe in the last seven years, and the mortal tide continues with numbing regularity.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His face is a patchwork of gauze-covered gashes. His wrist is sprained and his back is bruised and burned from shielding his mother from falling bricks and fireballs. But Ibrahim Joughlaf knows those wounds will heal. What may be irrevocably broken is the 26-year-old baker's conviction that even the son of impoverished Moroccan immigrants can find a place in prosperous Europe, that even for the little guy justice triumphs.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she arrived from Ghana 18 years ago, trained caterer Anna Saakwa was swiftly granted a license in her field. She found work cooking for an old folks' home and learned fluent Danish thanks to the patient tutelage of co-workers and the retirees she was hired to serve. Such was the pleasant experience for most refugees in Denmark until a few years ago, when opponents of immigration gained the upper hand.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LEON LAZAROFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Mamodu Jalloh left Sierra Leone in May, he had never heard of this Spanish enclave on the tip of North Africa, surrounded on one side by the Mediterranean and on the other by Morocco. Jalloh, 28, wanted only to escape a civil war that has killed thousands, including his father, in his West African homeland. He made it to Morocco.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His new blue suit pressed, his lone suitcase perched hopefully nearby, the man who called himself Kanda Koso patiently awaited his fate. After trying to get through immigration at the sprawling Schiphol Airport with a false Zairian passport, the self-described 26-year-old shoemaker promptly declared that he wanted political asylum. Now he sat in a corner of the empty immigration area as Dutch authorities discussed his fate and tried to determine if he really was from Zaire.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Semsa Kasic's only comforts in life are more likely tragedies she hasn't learned of yet. The 66-year-old Muslim who was pushed from her home at gunpoint in the Bosnian village of Sepak lives for the day she can be reunited with her son, who was taken away by Serbian gunmen who looted and burned their home three months ago. She is unaware of the guerrillas' boast that they take no prisoners.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Argentina was a mecca for migrants, Maria del Carmen Pinera came with her family from Spain. Her father was a carpenter. She was 5 years old. Now 44, Pinera wants to go back. She has relatives in Spain who tell her it is a land of opportunity where her children can find work, salaries are good and progress is in the air. And so, like many Argentines whose European parents or grandparents came to this once-promising land, Pinera is getting her papers in order for the return trip.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | From Religious News Service
In the midst of a slumping economy, national religious agencies that resettle refugees are scrambling to find congregations willing to a adopt Haitians entering the United States. Church workers say that finding a job and a place to live for the Haitians, at a time when growing numbers of Americans have neither, is getting harder. Beyond those immediate problems, religious organizations involved in resettlement have begun to take on a much bigger cause.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | From Religious News Service
In the midst of a slumping economy, national religious agencies that resettle refugees are scrambling to find congregations willing to a adopt Haitians entering the United States. Church workers say that finding a job and a place to live for the Haitians, at a time when growing numbers of Americans have neither, is getting harder. Beyond those immediate problems, religious organizations involved in resettlement have begun to take on a much bigger cause.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hands folded, the little family matriarch lifted her head slightly and began to count. There was her husband, her son, his wife and their three children. There was another son, a daughter and seven more grandchildren. "We're all going together," concluded Lydia Stahlbaum, who works in the office of the local collective farm in this town in Kazakhstan. "I think we will be in Germany by spring."
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