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TRAVEL
March 25, 2001 | PHIL VETTEL, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
In Europe, these are tough times to be a beef eater. First there was mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, which riddles the brains of its victims with sponge-like holes. It hit Great Britain hard and has spread to the Continent, where updates on la vache folle (French) and mucca pazza (Italian) are heard almost daily. Cattle contract the fatal, untreatable disease from eating contaminated feed.
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OPINION
October 25, 1992 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business and Management
As President, Bill Clinton's fatal attraction may not be his pandering or his passion for cheeseburgers, but his longing for European-style industrial policies. Highly statist and, at best, ill-suited to American reali ties, these European models could lead a Clinton Administration onto a dangerous course at a time when the opportunity to reverse our economic stagnation is greatest. Whether Clinton takes the European road will depend, in part, on his faith in such advisers as Harvard's Robert B.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ROBERT SEELY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
German and Spanish aerospace titans plan to merge. Britain's two largest defense concerns have joined forces as the world's third-biggest arms producer. The French government is beginning to privatize its defense businesses. The end of the Cold War a decade ago has left Europe's defense industries fighting for shares of a dwindling arms market and inspired a round of pan-European mergers and talk of transatlantic deals.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ROBERT SEELY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
German and Spanish aerospace titans plan to merge. Britain's two largest defense concerns have joined forces as the world's third-biggest arms producer. The French government is beginning to privatize its defense businesses. The end of the Cold War a decade ago has left Europe's defense industries fighting for shares of a dwindling arms market and inspired a round of pan-European mergers and talk of transatlantic deals.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2001 | PHIL VETTEL, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
In Europe, these are tough times to be a beef eater. First there was mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, which riddles the brains of its victims with sponge-like holes. It hit Great Britain hard and has spread to the Continent, where updates on la vache folle (French) and mucca pazza (Italian) are heard almost daily. Cattle contract the fatal, untreatable disease from eating contaminated feed.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | From Reuters
A passenger airship service was launched over London today, the first in Britain since 1937, the year the German airship Hindenburg caught fire in the United States, killing 36 people. British Aviation Minister Michael Spicer was one of the first passengers to board the Airship Industries Skyship on the 70-minute sightseeing trip over London. The flight, for five passengers at 1,000 feet, costs $150 a person.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's "mad cow" crisis felled its first victims Tuesday, as Health Minister Andrea Fischer and Agriculture Minister Karl-Heinz Funke were forced to resign for failing to halt the spread of the disease to this country after at least 80 people had died of it across Europe.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnamese quaffed Pepsi-Cola legally for the first time in 19 years on Friday as the country celebrated President Clinton's decision to lift America's trade embargo against its old Communist foe. The government in Hanoi issued a restrained statement saluting Clinton's move and offering to exchange liaison offices as a first step toward normalizing diplomatic relations. "This is a positive and significant decision, which contributes to opening a new page in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2007 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Stepping in where the Bush administration has refused to tread, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and five other Western governors, joined by two Canadian provincial leaders, pledged Wednesday to enforce a tough regional cap on greenhouse gas emissions. Under the Western Climate Initiative, the leaders agreed to slash emissions of carbon dioxide and other climate-warming pollutants to 15% below 2005 levels in their states and provinces in the next 13 years.
OPINION
October 25, 1992 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business and Management
As President, Bill Clinton's fatal attraction may not be his pandering or his passion for cheeseburgers, but his longing for European-style industrial policies. Highly statist and, at best, ill-suited to American reali ties, these European models could lead a Clinton Administration onto a dangerous course at a time when the opportunity to reverse our economic stagnation is greatest. Whether Clinton takes the European road will depend, in part, on his faith in such advisers as Harvard's Robert B.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Think of the movie business for a moment not as an entertainment enterprise but as an enormous cargo ship. Turning on a dime is not this vessel's specialty; even attempting to change direction is a herculean task that may take a while to show results. But there have been moments in Hollywood history when the opposite has happened, when lightning has struck and films have come around that so shattered existing paradigms that change was inevitable. The question is: Which films are they?
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the scourge of some of Europe's biggest industries, notably airlines and electronics. At one time or another his detractors have included many of Europe's governments--particularly the French but even his own in Britain. Arguably, anybody who has compiled such an enemy list must be doing something right. And this much at least is undeniable: Sir Leon Brittan, the European Community's commissioner for antitrust policy, has made people all over Europe stand up and take notice.
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