Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEurope Japan
IN THE NEWS

Europe Japan

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | From Bloomberg News and Times Staff
Can anything stop the dollar? The U.S. currency surged Thursday to an eight-month high against the euro and a three-month high against the yen as traders continued to judge the U.S. economy's prospects superior to its rivals'. It took 83.64 cents to buy a euro Thursday in New York, down from 84.78 cents Tuesday and the weakest level for the euro since October. Meanwhile, one dollar bought 125.77 yen in New York, up from 124.45 Tuesday and the most since 126.80 on April 2.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Reserve and four other central banks moved to inject billions of U.S. dollars into Europe's troubled banking system, giving a dose of confidence to investors who have grown worried about the ripple effects of the Greek debt crisis. The coordinated action is intended to give large European banks ample access to dollars, thus heading off the risk of a lending crunch that could gum up the credit markets and worsen the global economy. European banks, particularly in France, have had trouble raising dollars from U.S. investors and financial institutions, which are scared off by the Europeans' heavy exposure to Greece.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Carnation Co. is in the throes of moving from its landmark headquarters in the mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles into the largest office building in Glendale, set to open on North Brand Boulevard on Tuesday. The massive undertaking began late Wednesday and will continue through Labor Day, John R. Curd, company spokesman, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
At an idea factory like Pixar, clever concepts often land on the cutting room floor. In the case of "Cars," the animation studio's love letter to gear heads, one of those discarded notions has helped inspire the sequel. In John Lasseter and Joe Ranft's 2006 film, rookie race car Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) got a lesson in slowing down and enjoying the scenery from an unexpected detour in the sleepy town of Radiator Springs. In a sequence that never made it beyond the storyboarding stage, Lightning and his love interest, Sally Carrera, visited a drive-in theater where a James Bond-esque flick about a superspy car named Finn McMissile was playing.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1989 | From Reuters
The dollar started at its highest level for 2 1/2 years in Europe today on speculation that there will be no further easing of U.S. interest rates for the time being. A strong 0.9% rise in U.S. May producer prices, reported Friday, convinced investors that American inflation remains a problem, dealers said. The dollar opened at 2.0344 West German marks in London, compared to Friday's close of 2.0055, a level not seen since November, 1986. "It was panic buying," one Frankfurt dealer said.
SPORTS
September 7, 1994 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crumpled face down in a sand pit at the Misano racing circuit after crashing, tumbling and cartwheeling at 130 m.p.h. in the Italian Grand Prix last September, Wayne Rainey thought he was dying. He heard the roar of motorcycles racing only a few yards away and thought they were going to run over him. He tried to get up. He couldn't. In 24 years of racing, Rainey had fallen many times, but only once before had he been unable to move his legs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Like most people, I've long regarded the Abstract Expressionist painting done in San Francisco in the decade after World War II to have been a quick, sometimes deft response to extraordinary artistic developments principally being generated in New York.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1986 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III on Wednesday warned that failure of the Europeans and Japanese to "adjust their economies and attitudes" could unleash a flood of global protectionism and isolationism.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1986
European central bankers said expectations of a new round of coordinated interest rate cuts this month have faded in view of the better-than-expected economic performance of West Germany and a fall in the U.S. unemployment rate. Meanwhile, Japanese Finance Minister Kiichi Miyazawa said Japan will try to increase economic growth but had not agreed to U.S. requests to trim interest rates.
OPINION
April 19, 1987 | RUDIGER DORNBUSCH, Rudiger Dornbusch is a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Rushing from one summit to the next, finance officials are trying to shore up an increasingly fragile international trade and payments system. Traders believe that the dollar is overvalued, and daily they test the central banks' resolve to keep the U.S. currency from tumbling. Official denials of the need for further dollar depreciation are becoming increasingly frequent and hence more difficult to believe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Destined for American kitchens, planks of birch and poplar plywood are stacked to the ceiling of a cavernous port warehouse. The wood, which arrived in California via a cargo ship, carries two labels: One proclaims "Made in China," while the other warns that it contains formaldehyde, a cancer-causing chemical. Because formaldehyde wafts off the glues in this plywood, it is illegal to sell in many countries -- even the one where it originated, China.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Billionaire investor George Soros has raised a $1-billion fund to invest in real estate in Western Europe and Japan, betting those markets will do better than the U.S., a person familiar with the situation said. Soros has put some of his own money into Soros Real Estate Investors, managed by Soros Real Estate Partners, with the rest coming from pension funds, endowments and other institutional investors, the person said. Soros spokesman Michael Vachon declined to comment.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | From Bloomberg News and Times Staff
Can anything stop the dollar? The U.S. currency surged Thursday to an eight-month high against the euro and a three-month high against the yen as traders continued to judge the U.S. economy's prospects superior to its rivals'. It took 83.64 cents to buy a euro Thursday in New York, down from 84.78 cents Tuesday and the weakest level for the euro since October. Meanwhile, one dollar bought 125.77 yen in New York, up from 124.45 Tuesday and the most since 126.80 on April 2.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The finance ministers of the world's richest nations, meeting here Saturday, said the global economic outlook is good but the wide divergence in regional performances remains a worry. "We see improved prospects for noninflationary growth in the major industrial economies and the world economy as a whole," the Group of 7 nations said in a communique. "The challenge remains to secure a more balanced pattern of growth among our economies."
BUSINESS
September 17, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Internet retailer Buy.com Inc. said Thursday that an investment group led by Softbank Inc., the giant Japanese Internet investment firm, purchased $165 million worth of stock in the Aliso Viejo company. The deal gives Buy.com a last round of financing before a planned initial public stock offering and makes Softbank, whose other Internet holdings include stakes in Yahoo Inc., E-Trade Group Inc. and ZDNet, the largest shareholder in Buy.com with a 31% stake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999 | NORBERT WALTER, Norbert Walter is chief economist of Germany's Deutsche Bank
The Federal Reserve's Open Market Committee, which meets Tuesday, has given strong indications that U.S. interest rates may rise. While many are nervous about this, it also underlines one of the most powerful facts about the U.S. economy, its enviable position compared to its trading partners in Europe and Asia. The United States, unlike other countries, has the ability, using the standard macroeconomic tools of monetary and fiscal policy, to either restrain or boost the economy as it sees fit.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Billionaire investor George Soros has raised a $1-billion fund to invest in real estate in Western Europe and Japan, betting those markets will do better than the U.S., a person familiar with the situation said. Soros has put some of his own money into Soros Real Estate Investors, managed by Soros Real Estate Partners, with the rest coming from pension funds, endowments and other institutional investors, the person said. Soros spokesman Michael Vachon declined to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few of us get to live with sophisticated contemporary art before committing to buy it. But if you have the cash, you might consider luxuriating for a week or two this fall on a cruise ship that doubles as a floating gallery. Launched in late 1995 by Celebrity Cruises, the Galaxy is stocked with 450 modern and contemporary pieces by prominent and lesser-known artists from the United States, Europe and Japan.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1997 | PAUL BLUSTEIN, WASHINGTON POST
The world's richest nations have reached an agreement to outlaw foreign commercial bribery by their corporations, according to Clinton administration officials, who said the pact could end an important competitive advantage that European and Japanese companies enjoy over their American rivals. The United States is the only major nation that makes it a criminal offense to bribe a foreign official while conducting business overseas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|