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December 11, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the 12 European Community nations gave a lukewarm reception Friday to a sweeping proposal to combat soaring unemployment with costly public works projects, lower labor costs and more flexible labor markets. The EC unemployment rate, 10.7% and growing (compared to 6.4% and falling in the United States), dominated the first day of the semiannual two-day EC summit.
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NEWS
December 11, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the 12 European Community nations gave a lukewarm reception Friday to a sweeping proposal to combat soaring unemployment with costly public works projects, lower labor costs and more flexible labor markets. The EC unemployment rate, 10.7% and growing (compared to 6.4% and falling in the United States), dominated the first day of the semiannual two-day EC summit.
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NEWS
November 24, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Western Europe's economies facing an increasingly uncertain future, finance ministers of the 12 European Community nations were asked Monday to spend as much as $75 billion on public works projects. Jacques Delors, president of the EC's executive commission, said he told the finance ministers that Europe faces an economic crisis and needs to take serious medicine. "If you put a patch on a wooden leg," he said, "you don't bring it back to life."
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Western Europe's economies facing an increasingly uncertain future, finance ministers of the 12 European Community nations were asked Monday to spend as much as $75 billion on public works projects. Jacques Delors, president of the EC's executive commission, said he told the finance ministers that Europe faces an economic crisis and needs to take serious medicine. "If you put a patch on a wooden leg," he said, "you don't bring it back to life."
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