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October 22, 1989 | Tyler Marshall
Here are excerpts of comments made by Jacques Delors, president of the European Community Executive Commission, during an interview in his Brussels office: On the trade disputes between the United States and the European Community and managing American concern: "There's a close link between the spirit of the overall relationship between the U.S. and Europe on one side and the process of solving commercial disputes on the other. . . .
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WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Maria De Cristofaro and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Police in Italy swooped upon the powerful 'Ndrangheta mafia Tuesday, arresting more than 300 people — including the group's suspected top boss — and seizing millions of dollars in assets, in one of the biggest operations against organized crime in the country's history. About 3,000 police officers fanned out across the nation in the early morning sweep, which caught some suspects still in bed. Although the 'Ndrangheta is based in the Calabria region in the south, many of the arrests took place in the north, around Milan, where the group has increasingly shifted its operations.
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NEWS
January 16, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Delegates from 35 nations, meeting Sunday in Vienna, formally adopted an ambitious array of arms control and human rights proposals hailed as a new landmark in relations between East and West. Winding up nearly 27 months of European security talks, the delegates put their seals on a document that pledges greater human rights safeguards and better East-West trade and commits NATO and the Warsaw Pact to negotiations aimed at sharp cutbacks in conventional weapons in Europe.
WORLD
December 27, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Europe is fast overtaking the U.S. as the leading destination for the world's cocaine, and a single Italian mafia is largely responsible. The 'Ndrangheta crime syndicate, a ruthless and mysterious network of 155 families born in the rough hills here in southern Italy's Calabria region, now dominates the European drug trade.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
European Union veterinary experts Tuesday ordered all livestock markets closed for two weeks in the 15-nation bloc in an effort to contain foot-and-mouth disease. The EU panel said that livestock transport would be allowed between farms and direct to slaughterhouses but that a ban would be imposed on all markets and assembly points for cattle, pigs and sheep.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2001 | Reuters
Outstanding trade disputes and the question of what needs to be done to launch a new round of World Trade Organization talks later this year are expected to dominate European Union Trade Commissioner Pascal Lamy's meetings with U.S. officials in Washington this week. "I think the thrust of the meeting [with U.S.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Telecom Talks on Hold, Deadline Extended: Trade negotiators meeting in Geneva pushed back their timetable nine months in an attempt to salvage an agreement to open multibillion-dollar telecommunications markets to international competition. The deal would affect telephone, fax and mobile services and bring down the cost of calls. While it now costs about two cents a minute to provide a transatlantic phone link--the same as a local call--European consumers pay about $2 a minute.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mazda to Sell Ford-Built Car in Europe: The auto maker said it reached an agreement with Ford Motor Co. to sell a small car based on the Ford Fiesta. Mazda Motor Corp., which is 25%-owned by Ford, will buy about 25,000 of the cars annually and sell them through its European dealerships starting in the spring of 1996. After dropping a plan to set up its own production facility in Europe, Mazda said in October that it was in the final stages of negotiations to buy Ford-made cars in Europe.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
European Community ministers signed a treaty Friday on political and monetary union, cementing the EC's plans to create a super bloc with a single market, one currency and a unified voice for more than 300 million people. The Treaty on European Union was signed by foreign and finance ministers of the EC's 12 member states at a ceremony in this southern Dutch market town.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle arrived here Monday, refusing to comment on the alarm he and a contingent of American politicians created with weekend remarks in Germany that seemingly linked a continued U.S. presence in NATO with Washington's trade dispute with Europe over agriculture subsidies. While Quayle appeared to play down the remarks during a stop in Geneva, "tomorrow" was all he would say as he and his wife Marilyn began a two-day visit here as part of his European tour.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European Union leaders agreed here Saturday to reforms designed to make their economies more competitive, though resistance from France produced a proposal to open the alliance's energy markets by 2004 only in the commercial sector. Conducted within a security cordon of about 15,000 police, the Barcelona economic summit was the first in a year that has seen the introduction of a single European currency, the euro, and the assumption of the EU's rotating presidency by the Spanish government.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2001 | Reuters
Outstanding trade disputes and the question of what needs to be done to launch a new round of World Trade Organization talks later this year are expected to dominate European Union Trade Commissioner Pascal Lamy's meetings with U.S. officials in Washington this week. "I think the thrust of the meeting [with U.S.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
European Union veterinary experts Tuesday ordered all livestock markets closed for two weeks in the 15-nation bloc in an effort to contain foot-and-mouth disease. The EU panel said that livestock transport would be allowed between farms and direct to slaughterhouses but that a ban would be imposed on all markets and assembly points for cattle, pigs and sheep.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
European Union governments on Tuesday hailed their agreement on a pioneering plan to allow duty-free access to its markets for virtually all products from the world's poorest countries. "This is a global first," said a triumphant EU Trade Commissioner Pascal Lamy after foreign ministers adopted his hard-won proposal after five months of debate.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | Associated Press
European Union farm ministers approved a plan to revise their banana import system, hoping it will resolve a lengthy dispute with U.S. and Latin American producers and lead to the lifting of trade sanctions. The plan calls for the 15-nation EU to keep a transitional system of tariffs and quotas to allocate the quotas on a first-come, first-served basis as of April 1, until a tariff-only system takes effect in 2006.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For European Union leaders who begin a make-or-break summit on the Cote d'Azur today, the chief issue is straightforward but devilishly difficult: how to remodel a house with 15 occupants so it can accommodate 30 or more. Success is imperative if the world's richest trade bloc is to be able to admit new countries by the deadline it has set for itself.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dashing hopes for a badly needed breakthrough in global trade talks, President Bush and top European Community officials failed Wednesday to resolve a handful of issues blocking a 108-nation agreement that would boost world economic activity by an estimated $5 trillion over the next decade. "We had an extensive exchange of views on outstanding issues.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's 150-year-old temperance movement has been so successful in wresting this country from the Vodka Belt, people like to say that more Swedes live from alcohol now than die from it. With Europe's highest taxes on tipples, the welfare state's coffers get an annual infusion of $1.3 billion from drink sales--and the resulting high prices have depressed consumption and alcohol-related deaths and illnesses to one of the lowest levels in the developed world.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One French guest at President Jacques Chirac's Bastille Day garden party this month was plainly aghast. "Coke at the Elysee Palace?" he said, eyeing the bottles of bubbly dark liquid on the buffet table. "If it were up to me, I'd throw them out until they serve French wine at the White House." No American company carries heavier cultural baggage abroad than Coca-Cola Co., proprietor of the world's best-known brand.
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