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Europe Travel Restrictions

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BUSINESS
March 25, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
IBM, the computer industry giant, has advised its employees to travel on non-U.S. airlines from Europe and the Middle East in reaction to a terrorist alert issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. IBM spokesman Edward Stobbe said the warning was issued to the company's 389,000 employees Thursday. He said it was "very rare" for IBM to issue such a travel alert and that the company did so only because the threat of danger to employees seemed especially high.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
IBM, the computer industry giant, has advised its employees to travel on non-U.S. airlines from Europe and the Middle East in reaction to a terrorist alert issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. IBM spokesman Edward Stobbe said the warning was issued to the company's 389,000 employees Thursday. He said it was "very rare" for IBM to issue such a travel alert and that the company did so only because the threat of danger to employees seemed especially high.
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NEWS
February 21, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented protest, the 12 member states of the European Community on Monday decided to simultaneously recall their senior diplomats from Iran until the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini withdraws his "death sentence" against novelist Salman Rushdie. Britain, home to the Indian-born author of the controversial novel "The Satanic Verses," took the most extreme action by announcing the withdrawal of its five-person diplomatic mission from Iran.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented protest, the 12 member states of the European Community on Monday decided to simultaneously recall their senior diplomats from Iran until the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini withdraws his "death sentence" against novelist Salman Rushdie. Britain, home to the Indian-born author of the controversial novel "The Satanic Verses," took the most extreme action by announcing the withdrawal of its five-person diplomatic mission from Iran.
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