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NEWS
June 17, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The European Communities postponed a decision Monday on whether to respond with economic sanctions to the nationwide state of emergency imposed by the South African government, officials reported. Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher of West Germany said that he and the other ministers agreed on the need for a "common response."
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NATIONAL
June 14, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
On a back street in urban Cleveland, Hungarian immigrants built St. Emeric Catholic Church, where a dozen stained glass windows recall their history and a mural of their first king, St. Stephen, overlooks the altar. For more than 100 years, waves of Hungarians swept into Cleveland from the wars and upheavals in Europe, finding work in the area's steel mills and auto plants. They were part of a tide of Eastern Europeans who became a backbone of the industrial economy here. But the factories have been closing in recent decades, and now the churches are closing too. Under orders of Cleveland Bishop Richard Gerard Lennon, St. Emeric parish will be eliminated and the church, along with an adjoining Hungarian Boy Scout center and a cultural school, will be closed.
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NEWS
July 19, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West European diplomats suggested Tuesday that Austria's request for membership in the European Community faces a long wait. At the least, they said, Austria and other would-be members such as Turkey will have to stand in line until 1992, when the single European market goes into effect. In fact, sentiment is growing in some of the 12 member nations that the community should not be enlarged until the results of the single market can be experienced.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1998 | Bloomberg News
* KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Alitalia agreed to work as one company for passenger and cargo operations, a move that would generate $445 million a year in cost savings and additional revenue. Europe's fourth- and seventh-biggest carriers, respectively, will form passenger and freight joint ventures next year and they plan to extend cooperation to joint fuel and plane purchases.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | United Press International
The European Communities flag was hoisted officially for the first time in front of the organization's executive commission headquarters Thursday, in the presence of the commission's president, Jacques Delors. The blue flag, with a circle of 12 golden stars symbolizing the 12 member states, was officially approved by the communities' council of ministers last month.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The brightly lit circular chamber where the European Parliament meets is in a dramatic, modern building that seems a fitting place for making decisions that shape Europe's future. The flaw in the symbolism is that the building, the Palais de l'Europe, does not belong to the European Parliament. It is rented from the Council of Europe.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
The European Community on Tuesday delayed consideration of $1 billion in food aid to the Soviet Union to reprimand the Kremlin for its crackdown in the secessionist Baltic republics. A $540-million technical assistance program to that country may also be reconsidered in response to violence by Soviet troops in Latvia and Lithuania, the European Parliament's budget panel chief said in Strasbourg, France.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Despite intensive U.S. government and industry lobbying, the 12-nation European Community on Tuesday approved a non-binding quota that will limit imported television programs to no more than half of all transmissions in member countries. The law, which sets common television standards throughout the community, excludes news, sports, advertising and teletext services from the quota provision. It was adopted at a meeting of EC foreign ministers in Luxembourg by a 10-2 vote.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | From Reuters
Britain and the European Community launched separate monopoly inquiries Thursday into a hostile Anglo-German takeover bid for leading British electronics firm Plessey Co. The bid, made in November by Siemens AG of West Germany and Britain's General Electric Co. (GEC), is worth $3 billion (1.7 billion pounds) and, if successful, would create one of Europe's biggest electronics concerns. Industry analysts said the investigations would give Lazard Bros.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | From Reuters
Officials of the European Community held their first formal talks with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat on Friday and said they will try to speed up the convening of an international peace conference aimed at ending the Arab-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and European Community officials signed a preliminary declaration Thursday pointing toward an economic and political partnership between the two former enemies. Their "joint political declaration"--in effect, an agreement to agree in the near future on the terms of enhanced trade between the two sides--puts Russia on a path that could lead to its membership in the EC. "One more Berlin Wall has fallen," Yeltsin said as he signed.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
Staying in the world wheat market could cost the government more than usual this year because of a wide gap between global and U.S. prices. The Agriculture Department argues that higher subsidies under the Export Enhancement Program are needed to counter those paid by the European Community. The subsidy competition also shows why it is critical to agree on a world trade deal that cuts farm export subsidies by the Dec. 15 deadline under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration, hoping to build on its success with the North American Free Trade Agreement, this week began shifting to broader trade issues, including efforts to conclude long-stalled talks over global trade by the end of the year. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor resumed negotiations with Leon Brittan, trade commissioner for the European Community, aimed at breaking a logjam over farm subsidies and other U.S.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A vital behind-the-scenes debate is developing among officials of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--a debate that may determine the fate of the alliance and test President Clinton's leadership of the West. The argument, now shaping up as the centerpiece of the NATO summit in January, is whether to expand the alliance to include the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This is an olive grove, Italian style," says European Community fraud-buster Alfredo Bizzarri as he surveys 20 acres of mostly plowed-up earth in the rolling farmland between Rome and Florence. In the late 1980s, farmer Giuseppe Lelli claimed thousands of dollars a year in EC farm subsidies for more than 1,000 olive trees on these fields. Investigators, suspicious because the local olive oil mill was not turning out much oil, paid a visit to Lelli's farm.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | SALLY JACOBSEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It has been, well, to put it mildly, rather embarrassing. First, there was the flap over plans by European Community bureaucrats to regulate, of all things, the noise of lawn mowers. Then the French nearly took to the streets at the thought of limits on bacteria in their cheese. Britons were offended by a possible ban on their favorite pub munchies, prawn cocktail-flavored potato chips. Danes were furious when told their dainty Ingrid Marie apples were too small, but finally gave in.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The European Community Commission said Monday that it has signed a trade and economic cooperation accord with the Soviet Union that goes beyond similar deals signed in the past 14 months with Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia. The pact provides for a gradual lifting of import quotas on Soviet industrial goods by 1995 and cites a dozen areas in which the two sides plan to establish economic cooperation, an EC source said.
NEWS
February 18, 1986 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
After more than a year of wrangling and negotiation, nine of the 12 governments of the European Communities on Monday signed a series of amendments to the 1958 Treaty of Rome designed to reinforce their unity and improve their decision-making process. The remaining three, Denmark, Italy and Greece, declined to sign. The Danish Parliament has rejected the amendments because they go too far, while the Italian Parliament is against them because they do not go far enough.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | JACK NELSON and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States, Canada, Japan and the European Community, moving to revitalize stalled international trade talks, today reached a major agreement to bring about what a senior Administration official called the "largest reduction in tariffs in the history of trade negotiations." The agreement, which President Clinton and U.S.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could give new momentum to world trade liberalization talks, France finally gave grudging approval Tuesday to last November's trade agreement between the European Community and the United States on oil seeds. But at the same time, EC foreign ministers announced retaliatory sanctions in another long-running trade dispute with the United States, this one over government procurement contracts.
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