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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after European Community leaders signed a historic treaty for political and economic union, their two-day summit that ended here Saturday exposed all the stubborn national rivalries that still divide Western Europe. The list of issues on which the 12 EC leaders could not agree was long and deep: the Community's next budget, the timetable for admitting new members, the countries that will serve as home to a host of new EC agencies.
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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after European Community leaders signed a historic treaty for political and economic union, their two-day summit that ended here Saturday exposed all the stubborn national rivalries that still divide Western Europe. The list of issues on which the 12 EC leaders could not agree was long and deep: the Community's next budget, the timetable for admitting new members, the countries that will serve as home to a host of new EC agencies.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | From Reuters
Italy, which a year ago triumphantly announced that it had overtaken Britain as the world's fifth-largest Western economic power, has slipped back into sixth place, according to data released Tuesday by the National Statistics Institute. Italy's gross domestic product, the broad measure of the goods and services that a country produces excluding its foreign income, fell behind Britain's in 1986, the latest year for which data is available, after having edged ahead in 1985 for the first time.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Italy, which a year ago triumphantly announced it had overtaken Britain as the world's fifth-largest Western economic power, has slipped back into sixth place, according to the latest data from the National Statistics Institute released today. Italy's gross domestic product, the broad measure of the goods and services a country produces excluding its foreign income, fell behind Britain's in 1986, the latest year for which data is available, after having edged ahead in 1985 for the first time.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The brightly lit circular chamber where the European Parliament meets is in a dramatic, modern building that seems a fitting place for making decisions that shape Europe's future. The flaw in the symbolism is that the building, the Palais de l'Europe, does not belong to the European Parliament. It is rented from the Council of Europe.
OPINION
January 1, 1989 | ROBERT J. SAMUELSON, Robert J. Samuelson writes about economic issues from Washington
You don't need a Ph.D in economics to understand the European Community's common agricultural policy. It sets artificially high farm prices that create vast food surpluses. In November, for example, the world price for corn averaged $97 a metric ton. Meanwhile, the policy promised European farmers a minimum price of $212, a 119% premium. Naturally, European farmers produce as much as they can. Any surpluses are then dumped onto the world market with huge subsidies. It's clear who's hurt.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
For several days, political analysts have been sifting through the returns in the election for the European Parliament, a five-year term that will encompass the Continent's new unified market scheduled to begin in 1993. Basically, they have been asking: What do the widely scattered results for the 518 seats in the Parliament that sits in Strasbourg, France, add up to? The answer from the more cynical among them is: Not much, since the European Parliament has so far only diluted powers to effect legislation and political groupings from right to left that are often confusing and contradictory.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The brightly lit circular chamber where the European Parliament meets is in a dramatic, modern building that seems a fitting place for making decisions that shape Europe's future. The flaw in the symbolism is that the building, the Palais de l'Europe, does not belong to the European Parliament. It is rented from the Council of Europe.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | BEN SHERWOOD, Times Staff Writer
At 11:30 p.m. on a recent Thursday, while this provincial town on the Franco-German frontier was closing its doors for the night, the European Parliament was still in session on the outskirts of town. There was nothing unusual about this midnight meeting, which Strasbourgers and members of the Parliament jokingly call the "Late Show."
BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Widespread fraud is costing European Community taxpayers at least $4 billion a year--and possibly twice that amount--according to experts here. They predict that the single integrated market scheduled to come into being in 1992 will make the situation even worse. The fraud--mostly involving agricultural subsidies--is said to extend to all 12 countries in the community.
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