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WORLD
March 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Court of Human Rights ruled that Turkey's 1999 trial of Kurdish guerrilla leader Abdullah Ocalan was unfair, dealing Ankara a new blow in its bid to join the European Union. The ruling, however, is not binding. The court noted that Ocalan, who was condemned to die but later had his sentence commuted to life in prison, had only restricted access to his lawyers.
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WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A young Chechen man is stopped at a Russian checkpoint on a lonely mountain road in 2003. After being taken away to a military base, he is never seen again. That same year, Russia's richest man is arrested at gunpoint on an airstrip in Siberia. Today, he languishes in a gulag-style prison camp. The connection between the two detentions, one involving an unknown 25-year-old named Said-Emin Sambiyev and the other a famous tycoon named Mikhail Khodorkovsky, may not be apparent.
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NEWS
November 30, 1988
Britain violated the human rights of four men held under anti-terrorism laws in Northern Ireland, the European Court of Human Rights ruled. The court upheld Britain's right to arrest suspected terrorists without charging them with a specific offense, but it ruled that Terrence Brogan, Dermot Coyle, William McFadden and Michael Tracey are entitled to compensation because they were denied speedy judicial hearings.
WORLD
May 11, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
A former head of Formula One racing who successfully sued a tabloid newspaper over a story about his orgy with five women lost his bid Tuesday to force media organizations to notify subjects before publishing information about their private lives. The European Court of Human Rights ruled that the pre-notification sought by Max Mosley would have "a serious and unjustified chilling effect" on freedom of expression. The court also said that enough rules and institutions exist to protect complainants seeking redress against reports they consider inaccurate or unjustified.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Court of Human Rights refused to accept a complaint against NATO nations brought by a group of Yugoslavs whose relatives were killed in the 1999 bombing campaign. Judges at the court in Strasbourg, France, unanimously declared the case inadmissible because the action occurred in Yugoslavia and outside its jurisdiction. Yugoslavia is not part of the 43-member Council of Europe. The complaint was brought by six Yugoslavs.
WORLD
May 13, 2005 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
In a widely anticipated ruling, Europe's top human rights court Thursday urged Turkey to grant a retrial to Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan, saying his 1999 trial was not fair. The decision by the European Court for Human Rights is expected to stoke anger in Turkey and complicate Ankara's efforts to lead this predominantly Muslim country into the European Union, Western diplomats and Turkish officials said.
WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A young Chechen man is stopped at a Russian checkpoint on a lonely mountain road in 2003. After being taken away to a military base, he is never seen again. That same year, Russia's richest man is arrested at gunpoint on an airstrip in Siberia. Today, he languishes in a gulag-style prison camp. The connection between the two detentions, one involving an unknown 25-year-old named Said-Emin Sambiyev and the other a famous tycoon named Mikhail Khodorkovsky, may not be apparent.
WORLD
May 11, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
A former head of Formula One racing who successfully sued a tabloid newspaper over a story about his orgy with five women lost his bid Tuesday to force media organizations to notify subjects before publishing information about their private lives. The European Court of Human Rights ruled that the pre-notification sought by Max Mosley would have "a serious and unjustified chilling effect" on freedom of expression. The court also said that enough rules and institutions exist to protect complainants seeking redress against reports they consider inaccurate or unjustified.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 |
The government of Turkey put on hold the execution of Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan, a move aimed at enhancing the country's prospects for joining the European Union. The EU countries have all abolished the death penalty and are urging Turkey to do the same. Turkey's decision came in response to a request from the European Court of Human Rights to review Ocalan's appeal.
NEWS
November 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Court of Human Rights has agreed to hear a complaint by Maurice Papon, a former Vichy official imprisoned for his role in deporting Jews to Nazi death camps during World War II. The court said this week that it had declared admissible Papon's complaint that he was denied the right to appeal his 1998 conviction for complicity in crimes against humanity. His other complaints were rejected. Papon, 91, is serving a 10-year sentence in Paris' La Sante prison.
WORLD
May 13, 2005 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
In a widely anticipated ruling, Europe's top human rights court Thursday urged Turkey to grant a retrial to Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan, saying his 1999 trial was not fair. The decision by the European Court for Human Rights is expected to stoke anger in Turkey and complicate Ankara's efforts to lead this predominantly Muslim country into the European Union, Western diplomats and Turkish officials said.
WORLD
March 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Court of Human Rights ruled that Turkey's 1999 trial of Kurdish guerrilla leader Abdullah Ocalan was unfair, dealing Ankara a new blow in its bid to join the European Union. The ruling, however, is not binding. The court noted that Ocalan, who was condemned to die but later had his sentence commuted to life in prison, had only restricted access to his lawyers.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Court of Human Rights refused to accept a complaint against NATO nations brought by a group of Yugoslavs whose relatives were killed in the 1999 bombing campaign. Judges at the court in Strasbourg, France, unanimously declared the case inadmissible because the action occurred in Yugoslavia and outside its jurisdiction. Yugoslavia is not part of the 43-member Council of Europe. The complaint was brought by six Yugoslavs.
NEWS
November 30, 1988
Britain violated the human rights of four men held under anti-terrorism laws in Northern Ireland, the European Court of Human Rights ruled. The court upheld Britain's right to arrest suspected terrorists without charging them with a specific offense, but it ruled that Terrence Brogan, Dermot Coyle, William McFadden and Michael Tracey are entitled to compensation because they were denied speedy judicial hearings.
WORLD
April 30, 2002
Europe's leading human rights court threw out an appeal by a terminally ill and paralyzed British woman who wants her husband to help end her life. "The law has taken all my rights away," said Diane Pretty, speaking in London with the aid of a keyboard and a voice synthesizer after the ruling by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France. Pretty, 43, suffers from a motor neuron disease that has left her paralyzed from the neck down.
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