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European Fighter Aircraft

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BUSINESS
July 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany Pulls Out of Fighter Project: Citing cost and a new security situation, Germany pulled out of a multibillion-dollar European effort to build an advanced fighter. The decision makes the European Fighter Aircraft the first major victim of the spiraling costs of German unification. Germany's defense budget is expected to drop 2.5% this year, but public spending will rise by a similar amount. The decision by Germany, Britain, Italy and Spain to develop the plane was made in the early 1980s.
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NEWS
December 15, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The on-again-off-again, multibillion-dollar program to build the new European Fighter Aircraft now seems back on track, buoying supporters of the Continent's largest single industrial project. At a meeting in Brussels late last week, defense ministers of Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain--the four nations involved in the EFA project--agreed to go ahead with it.
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NEWS
December 15, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The on-again-off-again, multibillion-dollar program to build the new European Fighter Aircraft now seems back on track, buoying supporters of the Continent's largest single industrial project. At a meeting in Brussels late last week, defense ministers of Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain--the four nations involved in the EFA project--agreed to go ahead with it.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany Pulls Out of Fighter Project: Citing cost and a new security situation, Germany pulled out of a multibillion-dollar European effort to build an advanced fighter. The decision makes the European Fighter Aircraft the first major victim of the spiraling costs of German unification. Germany's defense budget is expected to drop 2.5% this year, but public spending will rise by a similar amount. The decision by Germany, Britain, Italy and Spain to develop the plane was made in the early 1980s.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
Defense ministers of Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain are expected to give their go-ahead this week for the European Fighter Aircraft project, clearing the way for the largest such industrial enterprise on the Continent to continue. Action is expected at the regular meeting of NATO defense ministers Thursday and Friday.
NEWS
August 4, 1992
The defense ministers of Spain, Germany, Great Britain and Italy will meet in the Spanish capital this week to decide the future of the proposed, multibillion-dollar European Fighter Aircraft. German Defense Minister Volker Ruehe has already said his country wants to pull out of the massive project because of its enormous expense and because the Soviet threat no longer exists.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1988 | From Reuters
British Aerospace said Thursday that a four-nation consortium of which it is a member had been awarded a contract to develop a new West European fighter plane. The company said in a statement that the contract, worth about $10 billion, was signed in Munich, West Germany, on Wednesday by the NATO European Fighter Aircraft Management Agency representing Britain, Spain, Italy and West Germany.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services and
Britain's leading defense contractor, British Aerospace, is closing two factories and cutting 5,000 jobs because of a worldwide reduction in orders for military aircraft, the company said today. The company's Kingston factory in south London, which makes fuselages for Britain's Harrier jet fighters, will be closed by the end of 1992, with the loss of 2,000 jobs.
NEWS
May 18, 1985 | From Reuters
The defense ministers of five West European countries have reached a compromise on the specifications of a jet fighter to be produced jointly for the 1990s. The $30-billion project is seen by the five--France, Britain, Italy, West Germany and Spain--as a potentially rich prize for their aircraft industries, which will lessen dependence on U.S. warplanes.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing excessive costs and a new security situation, Germany on Tuesday pulled out of a multibillion-dollar European defense project to build an advanced combat aircraft for the coming decades. The decision not to move forward into the production phase of the European Fighter Aircraft (EFA) effectively makes the prestigious project the first major victim of the spiraling costs of German unification as Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government struggles to regain control over public spending.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Premier Michel Rocard, outraged by the high cost and delays of the French Rafale combat aircraft program, says it is in an "advanced state of disaster." A senior French admiral, testifying last week before a closed-door meeting of the National Assembly's defense commission, said the navy would prefer to buy cheaper and more immediately available McDonnell Douglas F-18 Hornets to replace its obsolete carrier aircraft.
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