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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995
I found George Weigel's interpretation of European history (Commentary, Dec. 4) to be ridiculously inaccurate. He blames "Enlightenment secularism" as the cause of Western Europe's problems over the last 100 years. He sees European civilization prior to this period as being superior because of the "enduring cultural effects of the Christian Middle Ages" and the "Jewish and Christian understandings of the human person as made in the image of God and therefore possessed of an innate dignity and value."
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OPINION
March 29, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
"We have made Italy, now we must make Italians," goes the old saying. Today we have made the euro, and the crisis of the euro is unmaking Europeans. People who felt enthusiastically European 10 years ago are reverting to angry national stereotypes. "Hitler-Merkel" read a banner carried by young Cypriot protesters this week. Next to those words was an image of the European flag, its yellow stars on a blue background crossed out in red. Sweeping negative generalizations are heard about "North" and "South" Europeans.
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NEWS
January 9, 1999
Albert Hoxie, 86, influential UCLA history professor whose students included Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The basketball star wrote in the book "Black Profiles in Courage" that Hoxie "taught me that authentic history was not dry, lifeless facts, but rather the living legacies of real human beings." Hoxie, born in Adrian, Mich., moved to Beverly Hills as a teenager.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2008
Re "Ring Festival Is Already Packed," by Diane Haithman, Nov. 4: I am curious why the Ring Festival has to have a seminar conducted at American Jewish University regarding the use of Wagner by the Nazis, and who pitched it. Are any taxpayer dollars funding this? Wagner died in 1883, and while he may have held "anti-Semitic" views, his work should be allowed to stand alone, and without all the Holocaust political hoopla, as one of the greatest artistic works in European history. Should we not also censor Jewish-Israeli artistic works and demand seminars on illegal West Bank settlements, violation of Palestinian human rights, and the "wall"?
NEWS
January 3, 1985
Historian Eugen Weber, who served as dean of UCLA's College of Letters and Science from 1977 to 1982, has been appointed to the UCLA Endowed Chair in Modern European History by the University of California Regents. Weber, a member of the faculty since 1956, has written extensively on European history, especially that of France.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The many excellent maps in this book often show Europe with the west, not the north, at the top of the page. This eccentricity may stand as a metaphor for the book itself. "Europe" is an individualistic attempt to encompass the whole history of the peninsula from the Stone Age to the present through one man's eyes. A professor of Slavonic studies at the University of London, Davies tries to pay attention to the Eastern parts of Europe he says other historians have neglected.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2008
Re "Ring Festival Is Already Packed," by Diane Haithman, Nov. 4: I am curious why the Ring Festival has to have a seminar conducted at American Jewish University regarding the use of Wagner by the Nazis, and who pitched it. Are any taxpayer dollars funding this? Wagner died in 1883, and while he may have held "anti-Semitic" views, his work should be allowed to stand alone, and without all the Holocaust political hoopla, as one of the greatest artistic works in European history. Should we not also censor Jewish-Israeli artistic works and demand seminars on illegal West Bank settlements, violation of Palestinian human rights, and the "wall"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2007 | DANA PARSONS, ORANGE COUNTY
Some will see the dispute between the Farnan family of Mission Viejo and high school history teacher James Corbett in stark terms. The forces of light against the forces of darkness. The problem is, not everyone agrees which side is which.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Mark Weber, director of the Institute for Historical Review, asserts in his March 15 letter that Benjamin Hubbard has unfairly characterized the institute and its work in his column March 7. He argues that Hubbard must be wrong or the institute would not have gained the support of university professors. But who are those professors? Arthur Butz teaches computer science and wrote a book called "The Hoax of the Twentieth Century," which clearly denies that there was a Holocaust.
OPINION
May 21, 2002
Re "When Testing Trumps Learning," by Deborah Stipek, Commentary, May 16: Advanced Placement courses no longer hold the meaning they were intended to hold. As a senior at Cerritos High School, I have taken four AP courses and five honors courses in my four years in high school, and I must admit that the reason for taking so many rigorous courses is to help myself gain admission into the college of my choice. Three of my four AP courses were in European history, U.S. history and U.S. government and politics, and I have no particular interest in history or in politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2007 | DANA PARSONS, ORANGE COUNTY
Some will see the dispute between the Farnan family of Mission Viejo and high school history teacher James Corbett in stark terms. The forces of light against the forces of darkness. The problem is, not everyone agrees which side is which.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2005 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Past Imperfect Facts, Fictions, Fraud -- American History From Bancroft and Parkman to Ambrose, Bellesiles, Ellis, and Goodwin Peter Charles Hoffer PublicAffairs: 288 pp., $26 Historians in Trouble Plagiarism, Fraud, and Politics in the Ivory Tower Jon Wiener The New Press: 260 pp., $24.95 * A handful of prominent U.S. historians have found themselves on the hot seat in recent years.
BOOKS
July 27, 2003 | David A. Bell, David A. Bell is the author of "The Cult of the Nation in France."
The French writer Ernest Renan once remarked that for nations to hold together, their citizens must collectively forget a great deal of history. Yet today, far from forgetting, countries are engaging in protracted bouts of remembrance, from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission to the opening of secret police archives in the former Eastern Bloc. Memory may not threaten unity in the way Renan feared.
OPINION
May 21, 2002
Re "When Testing Trumps Learning," by Deborah Stipek, Commentary, May 16: Advanced Placement courses no longer hold the meaning they were intended to hold. As a senior at Cerritos High School, I have taken four AP courses and five honors courses in my four years in high school, and I must admit that the reason for taking so many rigorous courses is to help myself gain admission into the college of my choice. Three of my four AP courses were in European history, U.S. history and U.S. government and politics, and I have no particular interest in history or in politics.
NEWS
September 4, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Steven S. Koblick hasn't been president of the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens for even one full day yet. But his memories of the venerable San Marino institution go way back. What's more, they still ring true. On his first visit, he thought he had died and gone to a European country estate. "I felt that the Huntingtons had invited us onto their property," Koblick said, recalling a family outing in the late '60s, when he was teaching European history at the Claremont Colleges.
NEWS
January 9, 1999
Albert Hoxie, 86, influential UCLA history professor whose students included Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The basketball star wrote in the book "Black Profiles in Courage" that Hoxie "taught me that authentic history was not dry, lifeless facts, but rather the living legacies of real human beings." Hoxie, born in Adrian, Mich., moved to Beverly Hills as a teenager.
BOOKS
July 27, 2003 | David A. Bell, David A. Bell is the author of "The Cult of the Nation in France."
The French writer Ernest Renan once remarked that for nations to hold together, their citizens must collectively forget a great deal of history. Yet today, far from forgetting, countries are engaging in protracted bouts of remembrance, from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission to the opening of secret police archives in the former Eastern Bloc. Memory may not threaten unity in the way Renan feared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Mark Weber, director of the Institute for Historical Review, asserts in his March 15 letter that Benjamin Hubbard has unfairly characterized the institute and its work in his column March 7. He argues that Hubbard must be wrong or the institute would not have gained the support of university professors. But who are those professors? Arthur Butz teaches computer science and wrote a book called "The Hoax of the Twentieth Century," which clearly denies that there was a Holocaust.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The many excellent maps in this book often show Europe with the west, not the north, at the top of the page. This eccentricity may stand as a metaphor for the book itself. "Europe" is an individualistic attempt to encompass the whole history of the peninsula from the Stone Age to the present through one man's eyes. A professor of Slavonic studies at the University of London, Davies tries to pay attention to the Eastern parts of Europe he says other historians have neglected.
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