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NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
The U.S. and European leaders are working on a new agreement they say could expand transatlantic trade and investment, officials announced Wednesday morning. In a statement, President Obama and European Union leaders said they are launching talks within their governments to negotiate a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. “The transatlantic economic relationship is already the world's largest, accounting for half of global economic output and nearly $1 trillion in goods and services trade, and supporting millions of jobs on both sides of the Atlantic," according to a joint statement from Obama,  European Council President Herman Van Rompuy and European Commission President José Manuel Barros.
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WORLD
March 24, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
AMSTERDAM - The fight over control and influence in Ukraine should not be seen as a Cold War-era battle, President Obama said in an interview released Monday as he opened a European trip certain to be dominated by discussion of the West's response to Russia's annexation of the Crimean peninsula. "The United States does not view Europe as a battleground between East and West, nor do we see the situation in Ukraine as a zero-sum game,” Obama told the Dutch newspaper de Volkskrant in an interview published as he landed in Amsterdam.
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WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- European leaders gathered in Brussels on Wednesday to discuss how to clamp down on multinational companies that exploit loopholes or set up complex accounting schemes to lower their tax bills. Taking on an issue that has also become prominent in the United States, countries such as Britain, France and Germany are pushing for the European Union's 27 member states to share financial information and take other collective action to curb corporate tax avoidance. In recent months, Google, Amazon and Starbucks, among other companies, have been the targets of criticism in Europe for allegedly trying to pay as little tax as possible.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- Distilling their anger over reports of U.S. spying on European citizens and governments, including heads of state, European Union leaders are calling for a meeting with U.S. officials on the matter before the end of the year. In a statement issued by European Council President Herman van Rompuy and posted Friday on the EU's website, the leaders summarized their discussions Thursday on allegations of National Security Agency monitoring of phone traffic across Europe.    The statement, supported by leaders of all 28 EU member states, backed a proposal by France and Germany leading to call for direct talks with U.S. officials.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama pushed European officials today to take quick action to end their debt crisis, highlighting the growing concerns about the impact their troubles could have on the U.S. economy. But while Obama announced that U.S. is “ready to do our part” to help Europe resolve its problems, the leaders didn't detail new plans as they emerged from a series of meetings at the White House. Much of the annual summit between the U.S. and the European Union focused on the euro-zone crisis, Obama told reporters after his meeting with European Council President Herman Van Rompuy and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON  - Europe turned up the pressure on the Obama administration Monday to respond to new allegations that the U.S. bugged the embassies of some of its long-standing allies and eavesdropped on European Union diplomats around the world. Leaders and officials of EU countries said that, if true, the reports of American spying on friendly nations were unacceptable and potentially damaging to relations across the Atlantic and to joint endeavors such as upcoming talks on a U.S.-EU free trade pact.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 12 governments of the European Community agreed Friday, over British objections, to a conference next year that will prepare the ground for a single European currency. The leaders also agreed, again over British objections, to adopt a non-binding "social charter" that spells out workers' rights in the 12 countries. Britain's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who has long opposed a common currency and a common policy on labor, signed neither of the agreements.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush will meet separately next month with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterrand to discuss the dramatic changes in Eastern Europe. Bush also will confer with Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki next Wednesday at the White House. Bush will meet with Thatcher in Bermuda on April 13 and with Mitterrand in Florida on April 19.
WORLD
September 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Three European powers called for a new international conference on Afghanistan, hoping to accelerate and improve training of its security forces and lay out a timetable for Afghans to take back full control of their country. Britain's Gordon Brown, Nicolas Sarkozy of France, and Germany's Angela Merkel sent a letter to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon calling for the meeting by the end of the year. The escalation of war and rising allied casualties have sparked criticism in North Atlantic Treaty Organization nations about the continued military commitment nearly eight years after a multinational coalition toppled the Taliban government and sent its Al Qaeda allies into hiding.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
The leaders of France, Britain and Germany jointly urged their defense industries Tuesday to adopt by March 31 a "clear plan" to create giant, Pan-European companies that could compete with U.S. rivals.
WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- European leaders gathered in Brussels on Wednesday to discuss how to clamp down on multinational companies that exploit loopholes or set up complex accounting schemes to lower their tax bills. Taking on an issue that has also become prominent in the United States, countries such as Britain, France and Germany are pushing for the European Union's 27 member states to share financial information and take other collective action to curb corporate tax avoidance. In recent months, Google, Amazon and Starbucks, among other companies, have been the targets of criticism in Europe for allegedly trying to pay as little tax as possible.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- As the new U.S. Treasury secretary, Jacob J. Lew is taking up a familiar and so-far thankless task: trying to persuade top European officials to shift from austerity to more growth-oriented economic policies. That was a major focus of Lew's first swing through Europe last week as Treasury head, and on Wednesday in Washington, he again pushed the message, albeit gingerly. In a speech, Lew contrasted the divergent post-recession fortunes of the U.S. and Europe, noting that the American economy had grown for 14 straight quarters and added millions of jobs, while the Eurozone's output had fallen over the last five quarters and some of its member countries are battling extremely high unemployment.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
The U.S. and European leaders are working on a new agreement they say could expand transatlantic trade and investment, officials announced Wednesday morning. In a statement, President Obama and European Union leaders said they are launching talks within their governments to negotiate a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. “The transatlantic economic relationship is already the world's largest, accounting for half of global economic output and nearly $1 trillion in goods and services trade, and supporting millions of jobs on both sides of the Atlantic," according to a joint statement from Obama,  European Council President Herman Van Rompuy and European Commission President José Manuel Barros.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Stocks turned mixed after European leaders put off an aid payment to Greece, adding to investor worry over protraction of the Eurozone debt crisis. After initially opening lower, the Dow Jones industrial average turn slightly positive. The Dow added 5 points, essentially unchanged at 12,820. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 1 point, or 0.1%, at 1,379. The Nasdaq was down 10 points, or 0.3%, to 2,895. European finance ministers meeting in Brussels gave Greece an additional two years to meet conditions of its bailout package, the Associated Press reported.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said the central bank was hoping for the best concerning the European debt crisis but was ready to step in with more forceful action if needed. "We are hoping for the best ... but we are prepared in case things get worse to protect the U.S. economy and the U.S. financial system," Bernanke told reporters Wednesday. He defended the move by the Federal Open Market Committee on Wednesday to extend a program designed to lower long-term interest rates, a modest step in the face of slowing growth in the U.S. and abroad.
WORLD
June 20, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
LOS CABOS, Mexico - President Obama back-slapped and smiled through another gathering of world leaders this week, but left a meeting of G-20 nations Tuesday in much the same place he was in when he arrived: waiting for Europe to prevent disaster. The Eurozone's debt crisis continues to present a growing menace to the American economy. And that puts Obama in a position all presidents hope to avoid, especially in an election year: His political fortunes could be at the mercy of events out of his control.
OPINION
April 3, 2009
This week, President Obama found out how much harder it is to sell economic stimulus packages in Europe than it is in Washington. Obama went to the Group of 20 summit in London hoping to persuade leaders of the world's biggest economies to boost government spending to counteract the global downturn. Backed by Japan and Britain, the administration argued that restoring growth around the world required a stronger fiscal push from other developed nations.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European leaders stood shoulder to shoulder with Washington on Wednesday in deeming NATO airstrikes against Yugoslavia fitting punishment for aggression, but nervous neighbors in the Balkans and beyond feared that the attacks might provoke a wider conflict. "The fire in Kosovo could engulf the whole Balkans," Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit warned, echoing worries rife in the historically troubled region.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Declaring that there is only "one president at a time," President Obama dismissed criticism from Mitt Romney's campaign over his handling of the European economic crisis and suggested his rival's team had commented without full knowledge of the situation. In a news conference at the end of the Group of 20 summit in Los Cabos, Mexico, Obama also denied fearing that his reelection chances could be tied to whether Europe puts its fiscal house in order. His primary focus, the president said, is the state of the American economy.
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